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These will be some expensive toy hives.
I guess OK for just having 1-2.
:)
 

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That hive looks great but it is not going to stay nice and aligned for very long. Wood expands and contracts perpendicular to the grain direction. That means the boards on the side of your hive are going to make the sides taller or shorter as seasonal humidity changes. The boards on the end of the hive are going to make the ends wider or narrower. Wood can expand and shrink up to 2%, about 3/16" of an inch for a nuc high wide board. Wood doesn't move hardly at all in the direction parallel to the grain. So as your side boards expand and shrink, they are working against the screws that are in the opposite oriented grain. This will lead to eventual failure of the joint or splitting of the board. Orient the grain so that it is parallel with the box top and bottom and then as the boards expand and contract they will move together, and your box length and width will stay correct, with the height changing just slightly as the seasons change and it doesn't matter.
 

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Way to go Jose! The California people know the availability of Redwood as this is where it's grown and harvested. The rest of us only have WRC as an option so that's the lens we see that through. Lots of good pointers for future builds for OP. Cool Hex Plex odfrank. But I'd only have one of those for decoration not production.
For me redwood, though I love it, is no longer an economically viable purchase. That said, I have tried some WRC lately. I do like the cedar, but I have found that it shrinks until it is totally dried out. So now I have some hive covers with gaps caused by this shrinkage. If not this the WRC would be a great substitute for pine and redwood.
 

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View attachment 65628 so I built this from redwood pickets and made the boards look nice passing them through my wood planer after gluing them together. But I’m reading that bees do not like the redwood smell or stuff it contains to repel insects. I’m wondering if I lacquer it inside also will that help them stay inside View attachment 65628 View attachment 65628
I used to be a manager for Santa Cruz Lumber (now San Lorenzo Lumber). As a beekeeper I made tons of boxes from their redwood. Never had a problem. Same up here in Sequim WA. One of our local lumbar yards has fence quality 1 x 6's of redwood, good enough for tops and bottoms. I would never worry about using it. As for lacquering the inside for some reason. No. If you want, use some beeswax and or propolis mix warmed up and smooth that over the box. I do agree with one other woodworker, vertical grain wood should be avoided esp. as you used it for the sides. You might want to glue and screw on some side bars to strengthen the ends and keep it from splitting.
 

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If you do more of them you should consider having the boards on the box ends be the same grain orientation as the sides. Wood changes dimensions cross grain with moisture change and virtually nothing lengthwise.
100% correct . . .
 

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Make up some lacquer using denatured alcohol (lantern fuel) and propolis. When applied with a brush the alcohol evaporates leaving a thin propolis coating. Good to apply to the insides of your nuke.
 

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If you do more of them you should consider having the boards on the box ends be the same grain orientation as the sides. Wood changes dimensions cross grain with moisture change and virtually nothing lengthwise.
I would advise this also, no matter what wood you use
 

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Also important to put heart side outside. ("Dont let them put your heart in a box of pine!") This keeps top and bottom edges from curling out.
I like the memory aid - but I thought planks curled towards the center of the log?
 

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It shrinks more circumferentially than radially.
Well, I guess it's because I always use quartersawn ... um ... yeah ... um ... never mind. :)

I was sure that was the other way around.
 

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Well, I guess it's because I always use quartersawn ... um ... yeah ... um ... never mind. :)

I was sure that was the other way around.

There are exceptions like with extremely low moisture dry kilned hardwood and the initial cupping as it normalizes could be in the other direction. I have some pictures of hive bodies with the upright of the frame ledge curled out near an eighth inch. Heart in the box! Cant find it at the moment as my file system sucks! Keep an eye in the future for splayed sides and I bet wrong orientation is at work.
 

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I mean - this explains the condition my deck is in. :)
 
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