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Wood Natural material Wood stain Hardwood Plank
so I built this from redwood pickets and made the boards look nice passing them through my wood planer after gluing them together. But I’m reading that bees do not like the redwood smell or stuff it contains to repel insects. I’m wondering if I lacquer it inside also will that help them stay inside
Wood Natural material Wood stain Hardwood Plank
Wood Natural material Wood stain Hardwood Plank
 

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Nice! I don't think redwood is a real problem as it has been used by others. People use pine because it is relatively cheap (well, it used to be) and it is easy to work. In your climate pine should last pretty well while redwood is very expensive. That said, I do love that redwood.
 

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I'm jealous that redwood is not even an option for me here.
 

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That doesn't look like any red wood I have ever seen. We had a picnic table made out of some red wood that came out of a cooling tower, kind of stringy and splintery. Really rot resistant for sure.
 

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"redwood" Sequoia sempervirens is pretty hard to come by, and definitely not from Home depot.

It's a red wood, but it's not redwood.
 

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There's a pretty apparent difference between WRC and Redwood. The nose knows. It looks like it could be redwood to me.
 

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If you do more of them you should consider having the boards on the box ends be the same grain orientation as the sides. Wood changes dimensions cross grain with moisture change and virtually nothing lengthwise.
 

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Too many small knots and boards were cut from small stems. I dont think much redwood is harvested that small. I vote for western red cedar. I have it for siding on one of my buildings.
 

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Overview on the lumber of Sequoia trees.

Buy the wood from an authentic seller:

 

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"redwood" Sequoia sempervirens is pretty hard to come by, and definitely not from Home depot.
Specific lumber products are not necessarily uniformly available across the entire country, even at national retailers like Home Depot. Just because HD may not sell redwood lumber in your area in the NE USA, it can still be available in other areas! :rolleyes:

And, here is one example redwood lumber item at the Red Bluff CA Home Depot:
Wood Font Line Screenshot Rectangle
 

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Specific lumber products are not necessarily uniformly available across the entire country, even at national retailers like Home Depot. Just because HD may not sell redwood lumber in your area in the NE USA, it can still be available in other areas! :rolleyes:
Agree with Rader. I can buy redwood at my local HD. It isn’t always high quality but it is always available. Local lumber yards have plenty of high quality redwood available here. It is the most common decking material available in N. California.
 

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I've built a lot of boxes from Coast Redwood. It is light and warm, are reasonably easy to work, slow to cup and shrink.

Some critical points to consider: Redwood is **brittle**and prone to long parallel splits-- the frame rest rabbet is very likely to split off. Cheap redwood fence boards are now milled at 5/8th to 11/16th thickness -- this reduced thickness messes up the frame rest rabbet -- frames are more likely to slip off. 12 inch boards are worth a premium, and even 8 inch fence pickets are increasingly hard to come by. ConCommon and fence picket grade have sap wood (which rots easily). ConCommon is air dried, fence picket is often sold "wet".

Old barn wood (and even retired fences) can sometimes be scrapped out, though even that is often purchased for a premium as "decor". The old boards are often rough cut (so thickness is over dimension). Rough dimension wood needs recalculation of all interior dimensions, and tight fitting telescoping lids (and all other hive components) are often incompatible. Old wood is often "all heart" and other than brittleness and the occasional nail a serviceable wood (especially considering defect can be cut out of maximum 20 inch boards. Old redwood has substantial "silica" in the wood and will very quickly dull tools -- all carbide cutting edges is essential.

Over the years, I have gravitated to a hybrid construction: the shortside is cut from standard thickness pine, long sides are cut from redwood or cedar and lapped over the short side (no finger jointing). The rabbet lasts longer on pine.

I strongly discourage running vertical grain on the short side. This construction tends to quickly develop a vertical split that destroys the box.
 

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This is a redwood jumbo depth brood chamber made from painted siding. I turned the paint to the inside.
I have several of these. And redwood bottoms and tops. No tossing those around, they can be fragile.

 

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My Hex Plex Pagoda is 100% redwood. The boxes out of newish 1X8 fence boards. The other parts out old growth 1X5 fence boards.


 
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Way to go Jose! The California people know the availability of Redwood as this is where it's grown and harvested. The rest of us only have WRC as an option so that's the lens we see that through. Lots of good pointers for future builds for OP. Cool Hex Plex odfrank. But I'd only have one of those for decoration not production.
 
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