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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi, I'm hoping this question isn't too complicated. However, I have a hive that's been queenless for about a month. Mating flight happened a couple of times, but I'm assuming she went MIA. I ordered a new queen a couple of weeks ago, and she just arrived today.

While I was waiting on the new queen to arrive, another queenless hive raised their own queen and she started laying fresh eggs last week. So, in order to prevent the laying worker situation, I took a frame of freshly laid eggs and put it in my still apparently queenless hive. I knew I had a few more days to go before the new queen arrived, so I was hoping to also use this frame to provide additional verification that they were actually queenless and she wasn't just hiding from me.

The frame of freshly laid eggs was transferred on Sunday. I checked on them Tuesday, no queen cells. I just got my new queen today (Thursday), and I checked and found they were building emergency queen cells on the newly hatched larvae. So, I know these new queen cells are less than two days into that process, not capped yet by any means.

The hive seemed happy to receive the newly arrived mated queen, so I left her there in her cage with the sugar cap so that the normal slow release process would occur.

My question is, will they continue to raise the queens that they just started? Or will they break them down and have them as just normal workers? Capping shouldn't occur I'm guessing for at least another 3 or 4 days (erring on the side of caution). Will the new queen stop the process and kill the newly hatched queen-ish larvae? Or does that process just never reverse?

My plan is to go back into the hive an check a few days from now. Or should I check sooner?

Thank you in advance.

Katherine
 

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Sometimes they accept a new queen and sometimes they would rather have one of their own. In my experience, they'd rather have one that they've raised themselves instead of one that I introduce. But it can go either way. I would go back and remove all the queen cells if it was me.
 

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you "should" break them down, the closer to a queen they get the less they think they need the queen you paid for.

GG
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you, I removed all of the new queen cells this morning. The good news is, there's only one frame of brood, and it's not even full. So, I don't think I missed any. ;)

Candy plug is only about half way through, so I'll double check again once the queen has been released.

Best Regards,

Katherine
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Update: I checked again today and they had started two more queen cells (I don’t think I missed them). So I removed the two new queen cells as well. Purchased queen is still in her cage. Some of the brood is now capped. Brood on the edges are still being fed by nurses. Hoping that once all brood is capped that they will stop attempting to raise their own queen.
 

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They sure are stubborn. I would consider putting the queen in a push in cage over some emerging brood if she hasn't been released. The downside is all the interference with the introduction. Judgment call/ no right or wrong answer. Good luck. J J
 
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