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I just tried a little different technique when releasing a new queen into a hive. In the past, I would insert a queen cage between frames, but I always thought it was a waste regarding the burr comb that would result in just a few days. In addition, I have been considering trying foundationless for awhile.

I just requeened 8 hives with MN hygienic queens. I wired the plastic queen cages to the underside of the top bar using long twist-ties. I used Kelley foundationless frames.

The hives were checked three days after the queen was inserted. The results were that all 8 hives formed significant comb from the top bar. Seven of the hives had comb drawn in the middle of the bar, one was off-center. The off-center comb was built around the queen cage and the queen was not released due to the comb covering the exit. All other queens were released without any comb built on or near the cage.

I thought the technique was overall successful. In retrospect, the one hive that built the comb around the cage was wired closest to the middle of the frame. In the future, I will try placing the frame close to one of the end bars.
 

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Why don't you just put the queen cage on the bottom board? Make sure you push the cage in far enough a **** can't get it, and as long as the cluster reaches the bottom of the hive, and the weather isn't cold, putting a queen on the bottom seems much easier.
 
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