Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Thanks for looking over my question.

I extracted honey for the first time and things went very well thus far, however I am having an issue with feeding the honey back to the bees and I think I know why, but I wanted to check.

I have about 15 Oz of left over comb with honey that was mashed up during the extraction process, however there's still a fair amount of honey left that I want to give back to the bees.

What I (finally) did was to spread it out in an open container, then I placed it within a couple of feet from the front of the hive. Initially, I had it placed much further, but the bees were not touching it. And at this point some of the plain honey has even pooled for easier access, and still no interest, and this was honey from that same hive if that even matters.

The bees are flying over it when they leave and return, and after a few hours still no interested. Yesterday I had it in front of two other hives for most of the day, and no interest there either. I have been bring it before sunset though.

Since I have it in front of a strong single hive, with the entrance nicely reduced, I am not as concerned about robbing as I was with the other location, but I am wondering why there's no interest? My guess is that "scout" bees have to discover it and report back and in time they will get at it, but that's just a guess and I thought I should check.



Thanks again,
b1rd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
It means you have a good "flow" on and the bees have all they can do to bring it in. Get those supers back on!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies.

I actually meant a 'solo' hive when I said single. I still have the super on.

I watched the video, thanks.

That's exactly what I was expecting to see within the first 10 minutes or so, but I just checked and still nothing. And since I had the same tub of comb in front of two different smaller hives all day yesterday, I think it does sound like they don't know it's there- for whatever reason. Which is why I'm wondering if they have to somehow be directed to it by a scout or soemthing. I mean there's no way they can't smell it. All of the bees at the entrance should be able to easily smell it.

I'll leave it there all day and bring it in tonight and repeat again in the morning, and post back if/when they become interested, for anybody else who's learning this as well.



Thanks again,
b1rd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
It means you have a good "flow" on and the bees have all they can do to bring it in. Get those supers back on!
This is also what I was thinking.

In the past I could leave wet frames, the extractor, or empty sticky jars out and the bees would find and clean them within a few hours. This year they are ignoring them so far and all that is finding them is the yellow jackets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
This is also what I was thinking.

In the past I could leave wet frames, the extractor, or empty sticky jars out and the bees would find and clean them within a few hours. This year they are ignoring them so far and all that is finding them is the yellow jackets.
I used to leave my extractor out for them. Eventually I realized that i was helping the yellow jackets more than the bees, so I stopped doing that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,803 Posts
I sometimes set out honey frames or cappings for the bees to clean out and they don't pay attention at all when they are on some good nectar source. Other times they may not touch it till a certain time of day and I assume they have good bloom somewhere till then each day. When there's a shortage of nectar I can bring something out the door sometimes and a couple bees are on it before I set it down. They do smell the honey from a distance I would assume. I have seen a good number of bees hoovering around the open screened window of the kitchen when we are extracting.

I wouldn't set honey out near a hive, but a couple hundred feet or more away if you can. If bees from other colonies come and find it, after the feeding frenzy they may try to rob the nearby hive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
This morning, right as the sun came up, I set it 10' front of my strongest hive and it's the only hive on this property. If they don't do anything the entire day, then I'll just take it back for now and save it for when they are more hungry for it.

But here's the thing-

I did have it set out in another property for a day, where I have two other hives and at one point I left it within 15 yards of the hives. Both of these were free bees from a swarm catch and a cut-out, and are still eating syrup. In fact, one of them, which is still in a single Deep, is going through 1/2 gallon of syrup a day and the other is eating a fair amount too, so I would have thought they would have been all over that honey. I was more concerned about robbing with those hives, so I moved the comb to a different hive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
I put my cappings in a bowl which I placed on top of the inner cover, inside a spare box, then covered with the telescoping cover. The same way some people feed sugar syrup. The bees cleaned it up right away, no yellowjackets or robbing issues. Once the top layer was cleaned I scooped the cappings out and spread them on top of the inner cover. Everything was quickly cleaned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I went ahead and left it out the entire day and still no interest.

This morning I moved it back to where I have two other hives and after 5-6 hours of no interest there (again), I finally moved it to a feral hive that's within a cinder block wall next to my property, and after a couple of hours they seem to be all over it, finally.

Not my preferred hive, but it did give me my first swarm catch, which is growing to be a healthy colony.

I'm still learning about nectar flows, dearths, etc... so this was a nice learning experience. It certainly does appear that the lack of interest in the honey was due to a good nectar flow, which was mentioned a couple of times. I just assumed they would prefer the honey.

Thanks again for the input~

b1rd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,339 Posts
Feeding bees so close to the apiary is not a good idea, it can cause robbing of hives. Move it away from the hives, we feed around the corner not in a direct line to hives, but as mentioned, there is obviously something better out there they want. As mentioned in hive feeding is best, but also have to remember AFB spores can be in honey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Remember: honey is akin to canned nectar; it is preserved food for the winter.
Bees vastly prefer nectar, and even sugar water.


Thanks for looking over my question.

I extracted honey for the first time and things went very well thus far, however I am having an issue with feeding the honey back to the bees and I think I know why, but I wanted to check.

I have about 15 Oz of left over comb with honey that was mashed up during the extraction process, however there's still a fair amount of honey left that I want to give back to the bees.

What I (finally) did was to spread it out in an open container, then I placed it within a couple of feet from the front of the hive. Initially, I had it placed much further, but the bees were not touching it. And at this point some of the plain honey has even pooled for easier access, and still no interest, and this was honey from that same hive if that even matters.

The bees are flying over it when they leave and return, and after a few hours still no interested. Yesterday I had it in front of two other hives for most of the day, and no interest there either. I have been bring it before sunset though.

Since I have it in front of a strong single hive, with the entrance nicely reduced, I am not as concerned about robbing as I was with the other location, but I am wondering why there's no interest? My guess is that "scout" bees have to discover it and report back and in time they will get at it, but that's just a guess and I thought I should check.



Thanks again,
b1rd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Remember: honey is akin to canned nectar; it is preserved food for the winter.
Bees vastly prefer nectar, and even sugar water.
I did not know that, and I was thinking it was just the opposite. I thought the bees would have opted for the honey first. That helps explain things, thanks.

The feral hive it still working their way through it though. I expect it should be totally gone by tomorrow afternoon.

And it's not close at any of the hives any longer. Just the feral hive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I live in UT, and my understanding is that here it is not allowed to leave comb with honey, or just honey, outside of any beehive for the bees to partake. I believe the intent of the law is to discourage robbing behavior, but I am not 100% sure of that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
I would just put it in a hive laying it on top of the frames. Put a empty super on the bee's will take care of it. U don't what to start robbing.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top