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Which joint do you use to make your hive boxes?

  • Rabbet joint

    Votes: 83 62.4%
  • Box joint

    Votes: 32 24.1%
  • Butt joint

    Votes: 13 9.8%
  • Other

    Votes: 5 3.8%
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Discussion Starter #1
I realize that this question is going to generate a lot of different opinions, but is the rabbet joint sufficiently strong enough when using glue and screws? I think the box joint would be very strong, but it does require a few more steps.

I welcome your opinions on which joint would be good enough for a hive box. I say good enough, because dovetails would probably be best, but probably not necessary.

I tried to post an image to show what the rabbet joint looks like for those who wouldn't recognize the term, but it doesn't show up in the post???

 

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Rabbett joints do better than just "good enough". It is a viable and common joint used widely in furniture and crate/chest construction.

Big Bear
 

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I use Titebond III glue on my assemblies and I seal all exposed end-grain with it too. I make my nuc boxes now, but I buy hive bodies. Check out the cost of Miller's commercial boxes if you want finger joints. I was very satisfied with the quality. Very few knots, with perhaps some less than perfect handholds.
 

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we build all of our own boxes (500 or so to date) using the rabbet joint, titebondIII, and 1/2 inch crown 1 1/2 staples. They hold just fine.
 

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A fair comparison of rabbet joints or box/finger/dovetail joints would need the same number of fasteners in each.
I'm not a woodworker, but I think that ten fasteners in a rabbet joint would weaken it.

Perhaps a better test would be to omit all fasteners, and simply use the same glue. Then it is simply the joints that would be judged.

I have some 5-frame medium nucs that are only glued together, including the handles...
 

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Do y'all happen to have plans that I could look at or send to me on making medium hive bodies using the rabbet joint? Sorry I just purchased my first table saw and have very limited wood working skill / knowledge.
Jason
 

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Do y'all happen to have plans that I could look at
I designed a 3x3 mating nuc with rabbet joints. You can see the basic design on my blog. You can obviously omit the dividers to make a normal box, and if you want to make a different size box, all you need to do is adjust the height.

http://parkerfarms.blogspot.com/2011/12/mating-nucs.html

I use this design myself. I've just finished making ten 3x3 mating nucs and used the scraps to make nucs. It's all the same basic design, just adjusting dimensions here and there. I use Titebond III and about 3 composite deck screws per corner. Sometimes 2-4 depending on the condition of the wood.
 

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Do y'all happen to have plans that I could look at or send to me on making medium hive bodies using the rabbet joint?
Jason
Watch these two YouTube videos on building mediums with rabbet joints. I tried it last winter with a table saw and router and it worked great. You can make them entirely with a table saw if you like, but I like to finish off with a router for cleaner joints. I use just 3 screws on each corner after the glue has dried. They make nice sturdy boxes and you have 1/2 the amount of exposed end grain than you would with a box joint.

The only thing I do differently - I found that one 12' piece of lumber will give you 2 complete boxes, with only an inch or so of waste.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJfpDhNi2Gs&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dyyq4g51iXg&feature=related
 

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Thanks alot for the info y'all, I do appreciate it.
 

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Dovetail would be my first guess. There are also guys I've seen use various other methods usually reserved for high end cabinetry.
 

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There is a somewhat complex lock miter joint that can be cut with a table saw, and there are router/shaper bits that cut a locking miter joint all at once. The best feature of any locking miter joint is the absence of any exposed end grain. If the proper amount of waterproof glue is used, in conjunction with strong fasteners, the end grain will remain secure from the damaging effects of exposure to moisture and other damaging weather. I appreciate locking miter joints, but when I make my own supers, I rarely use them, I'm too lazy, rabbet joints are about as easy as it gets, except maybe butt-joints.
 

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I see some cut a 3/8 x 3/8 rabbet in both the ends and the sides.
I just cut the ends with a 3/8 x 3/4 rabbet, and leave the sides square.
Titebond III, and 1 1/2 crown staples. Hope you don't have to undo any.
 
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