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This is my first year beekeeping and I live in Brooklyn.

My first question is how many boxes should they overwinter in?
Currently I have two deeps and one super on. The super is nearly completely full of capped honey and there's some in the upper deep but last I checked there was still mostly brood in the deeps. Will they move the honey down eventually? When will brood rearing stop? It hasn't gotten very cold yet and this week especially it's been warm but that could change quickly.

My second question is should I be feeding them?

My final question is what should I do in the way of hive insulation, wrapping, ventilation?
I've seen a lot of different things so I'm not sure what is necessary going into winter.

This is my first time posting a question so I apologize if I've made mistakes in what/how I ask. Let me know if I should post this differently.
Thanks!
 

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This is my first year beekeeping and I live in Brooklyn.

My first question is how many boxes should they overwinter in?
Currently I have two deeps and one super on. The super is nearly completely full of capped honey and there's some in the upper deep but last I checked there was still mostly brood in the deeps. Will they move the honey down eventually? When will brood rearing stop? It hasn't gotten very cold yet and this week especially it's been warm but that could change quickly.

My second question is should I be feeding them?

My final question is what should I do in the way of hive insulation, wrapping, ventilation?
I've seen a lot of different things so I'm not sure what is necessary going into winter.

This is my first time posting a question so I apologize if I've made mistakes in what/how I ask. Let me know if I should post this differently.
Thanks!
It would help if we knew where you are at. Here in Gt Falls Mt there is a foot of snow on the ground and It was 15F this morning. If you are where bees are still making honey, I would pull the super and start feeding mass quantities of 2:1 Syrup. I weigh my hives and stop feeding when the hive, bees and all weigh 125-140 lbs. If your climate allows that, I would get after it. If you leave the super on, just realize come spring it will be full of brood and no longer be a super but a brood chamber.
 

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Agree with Vance. I do see that you are in Brooklyn so while your winter is more moderate than here in New England, you do have a long, cold winter.
You need to feed and feed a large amount quickly. A good method is to buy unused one gallon paint cans at a paint store. Use a nail to put 6 small holes in the lid fill with 2:1 syrup and place on top bars with some sticks on the bars to provide a little gap. Place a deep box (or anything sturdy that closes off the hive) then your inner and outer cover. This method forces them to take a large amount of syrup quickly and the hive helps keep it warm enough for them to consume. When syrup gets below 50f they stop taking it.
In your location the queen will slow down but may never totally stop laying. They will start filling the brood chamber with the syrup as space becomes available.
Research quilt boxes for ventilation ideas. Wrapping can be done with tar paper(old school) or foam board. There are also wrapping products available at beekeeping supply stores. You may not need to wrap at all but most do. The most important thing is to minimize wind, but keeping the hive temperature warmer and moderated through winter temperature swings is also beneficial. J
 

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I try to go into winter with 2-3 mediums filled with honey and/or syrup per hive. This varies by location though. If you are at less than 2 mediums/1 deep of stores I would start feeding. The bees do not move the honey/stores down, they eat thier way up in the hive during the winter, so you want the food above them.

As for wrapping there is a lot of debate about this. I run quilt boxes year round due to mold/humidity issues and wrap my hives with 1" styrafoam sheets during the winter. This seems to work for me.
 
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