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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have two hives. One I started last year and one I started last week. I went to check on the new hive yesterday and while I was out there checked on my old hive. To my surprise I found brood in my honey super, above the queen excluder. I have two brood supers; one deep and one medium, then the queen excluder, and then the honey super. I looked in the medium brood super and didn't see any brood. I didn't go into the deep super since it was getting late. I'm not sure how she got above the queen excluder, but I did take the hive down a few weeks ago to put a bottom board SHB trap on and maybe she got on the wrong side then. Anyway, I went ahead and placed this super under the quees excluder and put another super on top of it for honey. I moved the frames I found with no brood up (brushing off the bees and checking to make sure I wasn't moving the queen again) and then filled in with some drawn frames I had. Here's my main question. Will I be able to take the extra brood super I now have and move it to my new hive in a few weeks? I figured I would brush most of the girls off the frames before I moved it. The hives are only a about foot apart. Any suggestions?
 

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I've never tried a whole super, but a frame or two at a time is no problem. I usually spray the frames with bees with a little sugar syrup and vanilla added and also spray the over the top of the top bars of the hive your going to. Just be sure you don't move your queen in the process. You may be able to move the whole super the same way. Heavy smoke may confuse their senses also.


Mark
 

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If you move just the super no bees then they will take care of the brood.
Otherwise you could leave more bees on and use newspaper. I would stop any feeding during the combine or you may start robbing (the bees returning to their home hive may lead the foragers back to get the syrup).

Mike
 

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I've never tried a whole super, but a frame or two at a time is no problem. I usually spray the frames with bees with a little sugar syrup and vanilla added and also spray the over the top of the top bars of the hive your going to.
Mark
I never heard of adding vanilla to the syrup. How much per gallon, and why?
 

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Thanks for the info. I've never moved any frames from one hive to another and don't want to cause a problem. By using newspaper do you mean to take a single sheet and place it between the two supers? I take it that is so the bees get used to the new place.
 

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It is said that it slows the migration of the bees so they have time to get used to each other.

Thanks for the info. I've never moved any frames from one hive to another and don't want to cause a problem. By using newspaper do you mean to take a single sheet and place it between the two supers? I take it that is so the bees get used to the new place.
 

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Moving frames/combs between hives is a practice that is very common in beekeeping. Part of the reason many beekeepers, including myself, keep bees in only one size frame, is to make it more easily possible to swap frames between supers and between hives.

Boosting weak hives, assembling nucs and raising queens are just a few of the management practices that rely very heavily on being able to move frames.
 
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