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I have a Lang hive that was doing pretty good last year, overwintered in a double deep. This spring there was not much activity. I checked the guts and found little to no activity in the top deep but lots of stores. There in the bottom deep was a small cluster and I spotted the unmarked queen. She was there with a bit of brood both capped and uncapped so I know she was doing her job. Im all natural so there has been no treatment in the two years I've had the hive but I did not see any mites on the bees (I know, hard to see them). I pulled off the top deep so they would not have so much empty hive around to warm/protect.

Any how, I just made another inspection (its been about three weeks) and saw a lot more brood but only real activity on about four of the frames. The other frames are chocked full of honey. The apples are just about to pop, pears are in full bloom, spring has sprung here (Willamette Valley, Oregon). Should I pull the honey filled frames and put in empty frames (I do not do the wax starter - all natural style) to give them more room to build more comb for more brood? Or should I place a super on top so they can move the existing gooney up themselves for more room….I have a empty super but it once again does not have any comb apart from scraps left from last years harvest (I crushed and strain the majority of the comb).

Thanks.
 

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The number of bees are as much a limiting factor as no empty frames for numbers expansion. Could you extract several of those frames and then put them back in? That would be an ideal situation if the honey is not crystalized. You could eat some honey and the cleaning out of the combs would both stimulate them and give them room for more nectar and brood. You could extract them all but one if there is that much of a flow going on and leave that one for a rainy day or week.
 
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