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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings All!,

We decided to test out hot wax boiling this year for woodenware so that we could gain some experience before we expanded this process to all of our wood.

Basic Info:
11 gauge (1/8") steel tank 18x24 foot print, 24" tall, hinged cover, side insulated (from floor to top of tank) and heated with a large propane burner. Direct flame heat to bottom of the tank.

150MP Parrafin wax, Brazillian Gum Rosin (~75/25 ratio). Frying temperature 300-325F.

Issues:
The problem we had was that a good amount of the rosin would not go into solution with the wax. The rosin would settle on the bottom of the tank and took on the consistency of burnt caramel, even with constant stirring. Occasionally some of it would attach to a piece of wood that we removed from the tank. This stringy rosin was extremely dark brown (compared to the color that went in), looks like home made beef jerky, and acted like dried propolis. It either fell right off or could be scraped off easily. After a while it became annoying, so we removed as much as we could from the tank.

Questions:
1. Is this rosin residue common in hot wax boiling? If not, did we burn the rosin, was the rosin perhaps contaminated?

2. Do we need to shield our heat (place a plate of the flame to prevent direct flame to the tank)?

3. Is it common to not have all the rosin go into solution with the paraffin?

4. Any other suggestions of what may have gone wrong - we will gladly post more info if needed.

Thanks for all your input. We fried 200 mig covers yesterday (no paint) and will continue the process once we figure out our issue.

The result of the dipped woodenware is awesome, although I think we would have liked a higher concentration of rosin since so much was removed. The woodenware is nice and dry to the touch and beads nicely. Awesome method.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Ian,

We have scoured You Tube and the archives in depth on here and no one seems to address this issue or perhaps have this problem. Thanks! We will continue to search.
 

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I would say to use more heat. My rosin starts out that way and then dissolves. I have never measured the temperature.
 

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I use about the same ratio but I keep the heat about 275-280 F when I dip. I start the heat low until I get it melted somewhat before I turn the heat up. I don't really have much problem. My guess is that you have the heat too high... just guessing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all for the info. We will be at it again tomorrow and see what results we get. We will try a hotter temp.
 

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>150MP Parrafin wax, Brazillian Gum Rosin (~75/25 ratio).

I did beeswax and gum rosin at 2:1

>Frying temperature 300-325F.

I did about 250 F. I think 325 is too hot. I would be afraid of scorching the rosin as well as starting a fire.

>1. Is this rosin residue common in hot wax boiling?

I did not get that at 250 F.

> If not, did we burn the rosin, was the rosin perhaps contaminated?

I have not used the Brazilian rosin, so it's hard to say for sure, but my guess is you schorched it some.

>2. Do we need to shield our heat (place a plate of the flame to prevent direct flame to the tank)?

I have thought about doing a steam tank. It would only take about 12 pounds of pressure to get to 250 F if I remember right... and that would prevent scorching.

>3. Is it common to not have all the rosin go into solution with the paraffin?

Again, hard for me to say, I stirred mine when I added rosin until I wasn't getting rosin from the bottom.
 
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