Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you feed cane sugar , beet sugar , or do you know? Do you have an idea what your survival rates are?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,191 Posts
Beet sugar is cheaper in my area and that is what I use. So far I have 23/24 still alive. The one dead did it at the beginning of winter because they went queenless and my mismanagement failed to discover it.

Mountain camp feeding is not a cure all. It doesn't fix queen failure or hives overcome by mites. Bees can fail due to rapid temperature changes that don't give them time to cluster.

Mountain camp just keeps bees from dying when they move up thru their stores and find themselves against a roof with no carbohydrate covering. In long hard winters like this, that can save a lot of colonies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The reason I ask is because beet sugar beets tend to be GMO seeds . I know that the sugar is the same from either beets or cane , but with the beets being modified to be pesticide resistant , it would just stand to reason then that they are exposed to the different pesticides . I have a hard time believing that none of this pesticide makes its way to the beet , and eventually the sugar itself . I wonder if this might explain some of the unexplained hive deaths we have been seeing . The beet sugar is more common and less expensive where I live also , but thankfully ( or not ) I don't have enough hives yet for the cost difference to be prohibitive . Its just something I have to think about in my overall expansion plan .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,148 Posts
We use beet sugar and have a 100% survival this year and less than a 10%loss for the past 6 winters. I will take the GMO beat without question. Conventional beets are sprayed more often and with more pesticides than the roundup ready beets.
Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
I have used both and haven't noticed a difference. The most important issue is making sure your hives have adequate feed. There are so many factors on why hives die, I think it would be very difficult to determine if it was the beet sugar vs the cane sugar. Hive loss is more likely to be starvation, disease, weak cluster or queen failure.

I did move away from fructose five years ago and feel it has helped the bees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
so what do you do if come October your hives are light?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
685 Posts
The reason I ask is because beet sugar beets tend to be GMO seeds . I know that the sugar is the same from either beets or cane , but with the beets being modified to be pesticide resistant , it would just stand to reason then that they are exposed to the different pesticides . I have a hard time believing that none of this pesticide makes its way to the beet , and eventually the sugar itself . I wonder if this might explain some of the unexplained hive deaths we have been seeing . The beet sugar is more common and less expensive where I live also , but thankfully ( or not ) I don't have enough hives yet for the cost difference to be prohibitive . Its just something I have to think about in my overall expansion plan .
The refinement process means that the source of the sugar is largely irrelevant. I honestly doubt even a professional laboratory would be capable of testing any given sample of refined sugar and telling you what it came from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,072 Posts
You need to peak your head in there once in awhile. Start feeding beginning of September so come October, you don't end up thinking they are light. If they are light feed syrup. Bees will easily empty a frame feeder in 2 days come October. Repeat until they are heavy. 6 frame feeders usually does it around here.

Jean-Marc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
fields , while that is a legitimate answer , in my case , last year was my first year , and my harvest was a total of about three bottles . The only reason for that was that they were partial frames leftover after re-arranging frames as best I could to pack as much in the brood chamber as possible . There are times ( as in that example ) that we have to feed or lose a colony . That was my question of Jon , what does he feed if he is light . Maybe his hives are established well enough now that he has that choice to harvest or not .I hope that that will be my choice come next fall and all the falls after that :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
887 Posts
And what do you do if you're having a particularly bad year and not only are you getting no honey for yourself, but the hives aren't bringing enough in to make it through winter on their own?
This is the only time that I think you should feed...except for a new package. All other times I think it's best to leave them enough of their own honey for them to make it.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top