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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will likely have to build some more deeps fairly soon. I have a huge supply of 1X cypress that I'll have to edge glue to get the proper width. This is not a huge deal and the lumber was free. I am contemplating the idea of using a Porter Cable dovetail jig for the joints. It also can be used for finger joints. In the past I built many medium honey supers and I used a quick and dirty dado and screws. I've been using several for a few years and they hold up well but they are not in service all yer long and they don't take the long term abuse that my deeps do. If anyone can offer any tips or advice for a dove tail jig for these boxes I would greatly appreciate this.
Thanks
 

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Most bee boxes I have seen are made w/ finger joints, not dovetail joints or butt/lap joints. Dovetail joints are too fancy for bee boxes and I wouldn't want to nail such a joint.

Besides, finger joints can be cut on a table saw.
 

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I have made boxes using the same jig and they are very strong. I try not to make them too tight that way I can leave room for glue. Only nail or screw in one direction. They do look nice too.:)
 

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They sure do. Good job. Forget what I wrote. Go for it. But don't paint the boxes or no one will know.
 

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I make them that way as well using an old Stanley jig. I like the way they look. So far the oldest are 2 years old and holding
 

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Those will work fine. Box joints aren't very difficult to cut on a table saw, search for how to make a jig. Did two boxes tonight, I'm in the mood and the mower are all out of service at the moment -- not that I won't have to cut hay this weekend, but right now I have some time. Need to make a pile of shallows.

At any rate, there is no reason not to use the dovetail jig if you have it. Done properly you will get a very strong joint.

For edge gluing, make sure you have the lumber planed flat and jointed very square before gluing, or the joint will tend to split when you nail up the boxes. Probably don't need to tell you that if you are using a dovetail jig -- it's pretty obvious it won't work well if the lumber isn't flat!

Peter
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Those will work fine. Box joints aren't very difficult to cut on a table saw, search for how to make a jig. Did two boxes tonight, I'm in the mood and the mower are all out of service at the moment -- not that I won't have to cut hay this weekend, but right now I have some time. Need to make a pile of shallows.

At any rate, there is no reason not to use the dovetail jig if you have it. Done properly you will get a very strong joint.

For edge gluing, make sure you have the lumber planed flat and jointed very square before gluing, or the joint will tend to split when you nail up the boxes. Probably don't need to tell you that if you are using a dovetail jig -- it's pretty obvious it won't work well if the lumber isn't flat!

Peter
I am a little concerned about edge joining the boards. I sold almost all my wood working equipment last year so I don't have a Joiner any longer. I am going to see how it goes by glueing some up. I'll offset the edge joints with the perpendicular side and if I can get the dove tails to work I won't worry about splitting. Once it is glued and assembled splitting won't bother me. I've gotten past the pretty hive stage. The bees don't care about the boxes and I am looking for function not for.
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Just a suggestion about your gluing your edge joints. I've done woodworking for many years and I don't own a joiner. If you have a table saw with a good, sharp blade (preferably a finish blade) and you make sure that your fence is set equal distance front and back from your blade, you should be able to get good straight edges that will join up nicely. I've done table tops and dresser tops that way and have been happy with the results. The other important thing is to make sure you are using a good quality glue. Titebond II or III works well for me. If you have access to a biscuit joiner, you can use that to give you a little added strength but it's not absolutely necessary since you won't be spanning a really long distance. As for the Porter Cable jig, I own one and the biggest thing with those is getting them set up. I recommend practicing with some scrap first until you are happy with the joints you are creating. Just my 2 cents.
 

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I edge glue two recycled 1x4s to make medium boxes. I made a sliding jig for my tablesaw that the cut-to-length 1x4 rides on when squaring up the side edges of the board. By riding on the jig while cutting, there is virtually no opportunity for the board to move with respect to the blade (other than the direction of cut), and is more precise in that respect than using a fence. The sliding jig also means there is no fence resetting involved - or the possibility :) that the fence may get set wrong.

If you plan ahead, you can make the same jig suitable for squaring up both edges of that board - just make a shim/spacer that you can place between the jig reference edge and the newly trimmed board edge prior to making the second cut.



FWIW, I am using rabbet joints with those edge glued 1x4s, but do ALL the gluing in one operation by assembling all the boards around a gluing jig that allows clamping in all directions at the same time. The lengths of the boards are cut such that the rabbet joints of the upper rank of boards alternate positions of the lower rank. As the edge joints and rabbet joints at the corners are all glued at the same time, The box is quite sturdy. Once the glue and clamps are applied, the joints get stapled. I leave the glued and stapled box alone for an hour or two and do something else while the glue dries. I have not tried unclamping immediately after setting the staples - I usually have something else to do anyway.
 

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I will likely have to build some more deeps fairly soon. I have a huge supply of 1X cypress that I'll have to edge glue to get the proper width. This is not a huge deal and the lumber was free. I am contemplating the idea of using a Porter Cable dovetail jig for the joints. It also can be used for finger joints. In the past I built many medium honey supers and I used a quick and dirty dado and screws. I've been using several for a few years and they hold up well but they are not in service all yer long and they don't take the long term abuse that my deeps do. If anyone can offer any tips or advice for a dove tail jig for these boxes I would greatly appreciate this.
Thanks
We make 100's boxes per year with Porter Cable jig. We use it for 1/2" box joints. Use the straight comb. You will have to use one side for stop for ends and the other side for sides. We use 2 jigs side by side set up opposite to keep all the tear out on the inside of the boxes when we assemble them. There will be some tear out on the back sides. Use the best bits you can for clean cuts. We use 3 fluted carbide bits.

As for joining boards others mentioned edges need to be straight to properly glue them up. Box joints will help keep the boards from separating.
 
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