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Discussion Starter #1
I started a trap out for a friend on June 1, three weeks ago. I used a medium box with a frame of brood and what I hoped were viable eggs, plus two frames of honey and the bees have successfully occupied the box.

Today I inspected and don't see any queen cells, hatched or unhatched and all the frames seem to only have nectar and honey in them. I didn't see anything that looked like eggs or capped brood. They were festooning on an empty frame, but I didn't see any fresh comb either.

It's hard to tell from the activity if they are queen less, there is a lot of coming and going with intention but I really don't think they raised a queen.

Any way to tell for sure?? Planning on purchasing a queen this week, just to be sure. Thoughts anyone?

Thanks in advance.
 

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If you supply a box, have an entrance/exit through the box but don't restrict the bees from going back into the tree will they use the box as well if you put open brood in the box?

I ask as I have bees that swarmed and set up house inside a tree. I have screened it off and put a piece of plastic hose through the screen. It is hard to seal off completely as the hole is at ground level and goes way back into the tree. Most of the bees use the plastic tube. I think some are getting out without it...I think from around the tube.

I am not trying to trap the bees out of the tree. I am OK with them living there but would like them to use the hive I have at the other end of the plastic tube as well.

At the moment they are ignoring the frames and using the box as a through fare to the tree hive.

If I give them a brood frame will they be more inclined to actually use the hive box? I did give them a frame of nectar...they simply removed the stores and then ignored the frame.

Thanks.
 

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WBVC.. First seal all entrances/exits. Then insert your tube into a hole in your deep brood hive. After they get used to going through your trap, insert a frame with some unsealed brood. In 24 -36 hours you should have 3 to 5 pounds of bees. Nurse bees will come out immediately to tend the brood. Cleaners/housekeepers will come out and clean your trap, Fanners will come out to control temperature and humidity. The guard bees will be at the entrance because this is the only entrance to their colony. The queen will likely come out to inspect the unsealed brood, expecting to find another queen. When she finds no queen she will normally lay some eggs to establish her dominance over your trap. If the queen needs additional space for brood she may stay in your trap for a few days and lay in all the available brood comb. If not, she may stay in the trap or go back into the tree. Best time to get her to stay is during a good honey flow when she is looking for every available cell to lay an egg in.

Send me an e-mail, [email protected] and I will send you a complete explaination for your question, plus photos of traps just as you described above.

cchoganjr
 

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Thanks...the space they are using,as well as the tube into the box, is between the hole in the wire and the tube. It is hard for me access as it is recessed within the tree and only a few inches off the ground. I am going to try and plug the hole tomorrow as can't get to it today. Why they would would want to squeeze between 2 pieces of #8 wire rather thAn marching down the tube itself is beyond me. Most,but. Not all,use the tube.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Update: I was given a swarm. I placed a screened top board on top of the queen less box, placed an empty box with 2 frames of empty comb (spun out but lots of honey clinging) on top of screened top board, and dumped in the swarm. I placed a temporary styrofoam top with some plastic queen excluder glued over a hole on top of the swarm box, and left in place for two days so they could get used to each other's scent.
After two days, I removed the styrofoam top, combined the two boxes, and put the screened board on top, and replaced the hive cover.
No fighting, and bees at the entrance of the bottom box began fanning immediately! Success!
A week later and activity at entrance is that of queen-right!
Soon I will reorganized all the frames into the bottom box, and remove the top box. We're still flowing so they should be OK.
 
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