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Discussion Starter #1
Have a hive I think is queenless - but they keep giving me mixed signals.

I got a queen to re-queen them. But they ignored her. OK, maybe they aren't queenless I thought.

Today they are a lot on the landing milling around looking confused.

Too late - this morning I put the new queen in her own hive.
Thanks to Michael Palmer and another Gentleman for posting videos of what I can expect to see of how they will act if the hive is queenless or not. I set up hive with brood, nectar, honey, drawn comb and new extra wax foundation.
It was classic - They came out to greet her in her wooden box and some were flitting and some nas up in the air and when I tried to move the bees off the box, I could. Yea.

So what I'm wondering is - I have or should have a queen in a nuc that I can check on 10th. Egg probably laid 10th. Capped QC before 20th. Pollen going in.

I do not have any of the little cages people ship queens in. I do have queen introduction cage I made about 3"x3".

What I'm thinking is to put the queen cage over her on one of her frames - hopefully down low on the frame.
Then stand the frame on top of the hive to see if they will re-act the same way as if she was in a little box. Yes, I would have to stand there during this time and they are a hot hive that would not hurt my feelings if they were queenless and wanted to accept her.

Thoughts and advice would be appreciated. This is my 2nd summer - learning, but long way to go.
 

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Why not inspect the hive for young brood, eggs or the queen herself? seeing the queen is a sure fire way of knowing you have one. seeing eggs lets you know you had one at least 3 days ago!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hard to see with so many bee on my face and hands. They have always been a hostile group.

Last I checked they looked like they needed a queen. Could not find her, Not much brood and no larva. I can never see eggs.
 

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Why not put in a frame with eggs and young brood. If they need a queen they should start cells. Then you get to decide if you want the cells to proceed. If the hive you took the frame from is gentle you may want to proceed, but consider that the virgin will mate with the local bad boys so the workers from her may be hotter than you like.
Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I tried that once before - not sure if they were QR at the time or I didn't have a frame with young enough eggs - whichever, they did not raise any QCs.
That is why I was thinking to try a live queen this time.
Yes, either way - raised here - she could mate with local bad boys as their momma did.
Thanks Bill
 

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Natilie,

So let me clarify: you put frame with eggs and larvae into the hive and they didn't raise a queen, and you can't see any eggs and/or larvae in the hive after a while?

The eggs should be less than 3 days old - only in this case the bees will rase a queen out of one or several eggs, unless your hive is queen right, but as you are describing there are no eggs and/or larvae in the hive - this sounds really strange.

If your hives are "hot" use smoke and/or sugar-water spray - it helps to keep them down.
You really need to check entire hive, especially middle frames.
 

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Put in another frame of eggs. Check in a few days. We have seen an increase in failed queens that are alive but do not lay. In that case you will have wished you had clipped her wings because a shake out is in order.

Crazy Roland
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That might explain a few thing.

Yes, I'll re-check all frames - yes is strange. Apparently I have some strange bees.

Doing a shake out - hmmm - had not thought of that. Thanks
 

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Natilie,


The eggs should be less than 3 days old - only in this case the bees will rase a queen out of one or several eggs, If your hives are "hot" use smoke and/or sugar-.
????? A queenless hive will draw a queen from larva up to 4 days old! in fact they select a day old larva under normal circumstances. A hopelessly queenless hive will even try to build a queen from drone larva. Why should the eggs be less than 3 days old? I don't get it.
 

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Split the hive up putting the supers about 75 feet apart on a white sheet. This will confuse the bees and make each super much easier to examine.
I have had several hives taken over by AHB, have one now, and have done this with success to find queen and requeen.
Number the hives so you can stack them back in order when you restack them.
Hot mean bees are a pain but can be defeated!
 

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Why should the eggs be less than 3 days old? I don't get it.
During 3 days ALL the eggs are being fed "Royal Jelly". After 3 days they start feeding the brood regular food, but queen egg/larvae is continued to be fed royal jelly - she is a royal for hive sake :)

Royal Jelly is harder to produce, but it so protein rich so queen gets mature from egg to mature bee in 16 days vs regular bee 21 days and drone 28 days.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks all

Between the stronger glasses or magnifying glass plus pen light and spread them 75' apart to inspect - I just be able to find out for sure if that hive is queenless or not.

Yes, they are a royal pain - no such thing as going into the bee yard to see what is going on unless you have your full vent suit on and tall boots - got down inside my boot the other day and got me on the top of the foot - was glad I did not walk thru any fire ants on the way back to the house as they kept going in and out of the boot I was holding.

later this week I hope to have a laying queen in my nuc.
I planned to keep her available in case of an emergency - I sure could have used her in Feb. Maybe I can use a frame with her eggs on it to test them without taking a chance on them killing the new queen.

Wonder if it is fair to put a new gentle queen into a hot queenless hive (deep + 2 supers). Talk about overwhelmed. whoooo
 

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I also duct tape the cuffs of my suit when working with a really mean hive. Them suckers look for any way they can to get to you!
Good luck
 

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During 3 days ALL the eggs are being fed "Royal Jelly". After 3 days they start feeding the brood regular food, but queen egg/larvae is continued to be fed royal jelly - she is a royal for hive sake :)

Royal Jelly is harder to produce, but it so protein rich so queen gets mature from egg to mature bee in 16 days vs regular bee 21 days and drone 28 days.
Bees do not feed Eggs! Eggs have no way to eat. They are after all eggs. They feed worker and drone larva royal jelly for 3 days. and copious amounts to queens, But none to eggs. Queens are selected from 1 day old larva unless there is none available then they will use larva up to 4 day old. The drone cycle is 24 days not 28. You might want to read Michael Bushes "The Practical Beekeeper" or "The Hive and the Honey Bee" Just to get you started on the right path!

Sorry to hijack your Post Natilie.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Not a problem Tenbears - I enjoy reading your comments in many questions.

Fishwest - I have not tried ductaping my pants - but I usully have full suit on and am wearing milking barn boots that come half way to my knees.
Yes, they do want in - right now the elastic around my wrists is a little bit loose at times and they are sneaking inside my suite that way. not fun. Got some soft flexible pigskin welding gloves today that I'll add longer sleeves to the long cuffs. Hope that keeps them out.
 

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Bees do not feed Eggs! Eggs have no way to eat. They are after all eggs. They feed worker and drone larva royal jelly for 3 days. and copious amounts to queens, But none to eggs. Queens are selected from 1 day old larva unless there is none available then they will use larva up to 4 day old. The drone cycle is 24 days not 28. You might want to read Michael Bushes "The Practical Beekeeper" or "The Hive and the Honey Bee" Just to get you started on the right path!

Sorry to hijack your Post Natilie.
Maybe I misspoke.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_jelly
 

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The egg hatches into a larva on day 3.5
If it's selected to be a queen cell it is fed a lot of royal jelly.
Bees don't feed eggs until after they've hatched.

This post is brought to you by the letter "Y" and the number "7". ;)
 
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