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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I popped the top of one of my hives today to see if they need any more boxes and I could hear the roar of fanning from deep in the hive. It got me thinking... I have heard the queenless roar before, but is there a way to tell if it they are just fanning because they are hot? I can't remember the sound well enough to know if there is a difference.

Do they make the sound even when you aren't looking in the hive?

I'm am pretty sure these girls are just hot, but I was wondering for future reference.

Thank you for sharing any experience you have
 

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Queenless roar is a bit diff than fanning. Fanning to me sounds like a low buzz, the queenless roar sounds like angry bees to me.. Almost like what they sound like when swarming in a way. For sure a diff sound.
 

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I just came inside checking some nuc splits that I did late last week. Sure enough they are building queen cells and the roar was overwhelming. But at high noon the new foragers are out and the weather is rather cloudy here with storms coming in. So the roars could have been from anxiety or anger. I did get hit twice on my index finger and the mother hives that these nucs came from are docile.
Its in low to mid 90's here and 80% humidity. HOT. But my nuc entrances are 2 bee widths wide and only 3/8" tall. they still manage to keep the brood temp right.
Yours may be without queen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just came inside checking some nuc splits that I did late last week. Sure enough they are building queen cells and the roar was overwhelming. But at high noon the new foragers are out and the weather is rather cloudy here with storms coming in. So the roars could have been from anxiety or anger. I did get hit twice on my index finger and the mother hives that these nucs came from are docile.
Its in low to mid 90's here and 80% humidity. HOT. But my nuc entrances are 2 bee widths wide and only 3/8" tall. they still manage to keep the brood temp right.
Yours may be without queen.
This was a large colony, and I wouldn't call the sound overwhelming. I have had a queenless hive before and they were aggressive and had a lot of bees buzzing around loudly and not really any for Rogers working. I could tell from 20 feet away that something wasn't right.

I'm sure each colony is different, but these guys are working very hard with forages coming in by the dozens. I watch them every day very close to the entrance. Today is very hot and humid. I will take a closer look when it is cooler.

I always wondered if a nuc would be big enough to hear the roar from... How big was your split?
 

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You can hear the queenless roar from even a 2 frame split as long as there's enough bees on the frames.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That is neat. This my second year, so I am just getting started with doing splits and raising Queens and such. Sometimes I sit and watch the bees and come up with different questions. I can usually find the answers here on this site. What did people do before the Internet?

One last question... At what point does the roar stop if something happens and they are making an emergency queen? Capping the cell? Virgin emerging? Laying queen?

Thanks for the information! I is very interesting
 

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One last question... At what point does the roar stop if something happens and they are making an emergency queen? Capping the cell? Virgin emerging? Laying queen?

Thanks for the information! I is very interesting

From what i've seen in my own NUC's the queenless roar stops once one of two things happen. Either young larva is introduced that they can turn into queen cells, or a virgin cell being put into the NUC that is about ready to emerge.

As for the defensiveness it goes away once they actually have a mated laying queen in the hive again for a bit.
 

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Maybe the Queenless Roar should be renamed to Hopelessly Queenless Roar. If they have eggs or larva young enough to make a queen from on their own, then they don't roar so much. If they don't have any eggs or younger larva though, that's a different matter. They roar loud enough to hear from a few feet away. If you add a frame with eggs and/or just emerged larva, or a queen cell or a queen, the roar will usually stop and the bees in the hive will calm down.
 

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This is really interesting, as my bees swarmed about a week ago, and when I went out to inspect the remaining hive, at one point when I was returning a frame to the hive, the frame starting making this very loud buzzing, which I now know was the roar. I noticed all the bees on this frame started fanning, but it was just the bees on this one particular frame. I hope they are not hopelessly queenless! I noticed some uncapped larva, but am a little afraid this might be from a laying worker. Don't mean to hijack this thread w/my questions, but if anyone feels inclined to help a clueless newbie, please see my post "Please help with swarm questions". I now have one question answered though thanks to this thread! :)
 

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It was hot yesterday here in East Tn and all of my hives had a rather loud roar…I suspect they are fanning to cool the hive…if you are concerned you might want to go in and look for eggs or larva…good luck!
 
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