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Ok my question's are>>>>>>>

.1.. Lets say you get a Brand New Package of bees in install it and the queen dies 3 or 4 days later....... Will the Bee's Continue to build up comb and bring in pollen?
I know that cant raise a new queen because they have no brood or eggs...

2. Then you get another brand new package that the queen lives and lays lots of eggs!!!!! Would it be in the best interest to remove a frame of eggs from the queened hive and put in the queenless hive? So that they might have something to make a new queen from????
Mind you both hives are only about 2 weeks old......


I do not know for sure the one hive is queenless yet.... I will do a full inspection this Sat.... I did look at the suspected queenless hive long enough to see they were bringing in yellow pollen and two frames were solid with Bee's....., but I didn't notice any eggs.
 

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The ability to move a frame of eggs/young larva to a potentially queenless hive is certainly one of the benefits of having two or more hives! :)
 

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It may be a good thought to combine the two hives if one of the packages is queenless. If you look at the timeline you are gonna wait about 2 weeks to put eggs in the queenless hive. They will raise a queen and she may start laying 21 days later and it will take another 3 weeks to the news bees to emerge. We are at 8 weeks already. Population would diminish.
 

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If the one newly packaged hive is indeed truly queenless, then I'd say to combine the two hives and wait six weeks and then make a split off it to get your second hive going again. Reason I'd say this was given in post above by cwood6_10. You'd have much better chances of making things work this way, I'm thinking.

But, hopefully when you check next, you see the queen in there and all the worrying was over naught. Good luck!
 

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The ability to move a frame of eggs/young larva to a potentially queenless hive is certainly one of the benefits of having two or more hives! :)
Yup. Also a way to lose both of them when you are not certain about what you are doing.
 

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If you are not a believer in Acebird's 'do nothing':rolleyes: mantra, you can take steps to minimize moving a queen inadvertently even if you are not confident in your ability to spot the queen.

Simply brushing all the bees off the frame back into the original hive is one option.

If you want to move nurse bees as well, after bushing the bees off, temporarily put just that frame above an excluder in a new box on the original hive, with the lid back on. Wait 30 minutes, then move that frame and restore the original donor hive configuration. Nurse bees will have moved thru the excluder to the donor brood frame, but the queen will not be on the frame to be moved.

:gh:

.
 

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I myself would not want to be robbing a frame of eggs from the other hive as these are only 2 week old packages of bees and I would not want to weaken one so soon, they are not established with good population yet.
 

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Yup. Also a way to lose both of them when you are not certain about what you are doing.
How would putting a frame of larvae/eggs in a potentially queenless hive cause you to lose both? Ive done it lots of times and never lost a single hive?
 

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Can you order another queen? I had a package sit queenless in the hive for 10 or 11 days immediately after install and they didn't build a single speck of comb or really leave the hive at all. But I don't think they had every really accepted the queen that came with the package. The replacement queen was immediately accepted. The morning after we hanged her cage there were bees bringing in pollen. When we checked four days later and pulled the cage they had built comb and she had started laying.

How would putting a frame of larvae/eggs in a potentially queenless hive cause you to lose both? Ive done it lots of times and never lost a single hive?
Accidently putting the queen into the new hive that may or may not have a queen. Battle it out and end up losing both or at least damaging both?
 

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How would putting a frame of larvae/eggs in a potentially queenless hive cause you to lose both?
I myself would not want to be robbing a frame of eggs from the other hive as these are only 2 week old packages of bees and I would not want to weaken one so soon, they are not established with good population yet.
Look deeply into the post.
 
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