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OK so I did a cut out 3 weeks ago and after 12 days I inspected the hive and found NO queen and NO eggs laid whatsoever
so I added a frame with nurse bees and fresh eggs 8 days ago

tomorrow will be 9 days I understand by then I should see a capped queen cell

after work I plan on carefully opening the hive and doing an inspection

will there be more than one queen cell?

if no queen cells at all should I add another frame of brood?

any pointers? havent usually gone through this before
 

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You may get anywhere from none to 20 queen cells from a single frame, depending on the frame you add and the hive. I'm finding that the best results come from having enough bees in the nuc. The smaller nucs, apparently are taxed trying to make very many queen cells. However a large hive that is queenless can throw out 20 without hardly batting an eye... assuming they could bat an eye...

You must make sure that you have new eggs and/or 1-3 day old larva. The bees have to start with the extra royal jelly on pretty much the first 3 days, to get good queens. If you have new unhatched eggs on the frame, you should be ok. Additionally, the eggs and 1-3 day larva are particularly sensitive to temperature and moisture, so you must be quick and don't do the deed on a cold or windy day, or take alot of time looking at them. Best results come from a healthy number of eggs and capped brood. A small number, may not produce much.

By the way, 12 days is not enough time to see eggs, if your nuc was queenless from the beginning. They may have already made a queen, however it takes 2 to 3 weeks for her to get mated and then mature to the point of laying eggs, after emerging. Assuming you had eggs and 1-3 day old larva at the time of the split and no queen, it would take nearly a week to make capped queen cells, and another week before they emerge. Then 2-3 weeks after emerging to get mated and mature. So if the nuc is small enough, you could go on a queen hunt and try to lay eyes on one before getting too excited. And then if you can't find one, add another frame of eggs and 1-3 day old larva for them to try again.
 

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Another thought, is that at 12 days, a new queen could have been out on mating flights at the time of your inspection. So it is quite possible to have missed her. Also, if or when you add a frame of eggs to a hive to get queen cells, I find that if you leave some space between this new frame and the two adjacent frames, it allows the bees more room for longer queen cells. Emergency queen cells happen up in the middle of a frame, and it is hard for the bees to curve the cell down, so the extra space gives them the room they need to get healthy sized queen cells. FYI
 

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Amen to what Warmbees said.. and notch that frame in a couple of places and see those results go up even further. IMO
 
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