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1 hive with Saskatraz queen
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All!
New to to beekeeping this year and am wondering if I need to intervene in my hive's supersedure process? I got a nuc in mid-May and transferred them to my hive, which they took to well. The hive has continually grown but thinking back now, the brood pattern was quite spotty, which I didn't know was a possible sign. I had my Saskatraz queen marked so she was easy to spot. When I did a hive check on June 23rd I spotted her in there but also noticed some queen cells. I was out of town the next couple of weeks so did my next inspection July 10th and couldn't find my marked queen anywhere. So I got back in on July 11th, still couldn't find her and no sign of eggs. There was a decent amount of tiny uncapped larvae but no eggs. I also found what I assume is a new queen. She is unmarked, was on a frame with no comb built out, not running around quickly and it appeared the workers were tending to her. Since I didn't realize what was happening and therefore not paying close attention to certain details I don't know when she emerged or if she's mated. My concern is that I only have one hive, so limited time to get a new queen laying and I'm not sure there's any beehives in my neighborhood for her to mate with other colony drones. Should I leave them to do their job or do I need to help in any way? Any advice would be appreciated!
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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If it were me I would leave them alone, give her sometime, and check back in the hive in a couple of weeks. It took 16 days for her to emerge, she needs to harden, and then go on her maiden voyage. Then you are looking at least another two weeks before you start seeing eggs. I know it’s hard, but I suggest you remain calm, and save your self some drama.
Cody
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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If it were me I would leave them alone, give her sometime, and check back in the hive in a couple of weeks. It took 16 days for her to emerge, she needs to harden, and then go on her maiden voyage. Then you are looking at least another two weeks before you start seeing eggs. I know it’s hard, but I suggest you remain calm, and save your self some drama.
Cody
Every time I post from the yards, moderator if you would please, Thanks, Sorry
 

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There was a decent amount of tiny uncapped larvae but no eggs.
I think you're fine.
I might challenge the idea that this was necessarily a supercedure. Could have been a swarm. Not that it matters in your current situation.
If you're got very young, open larva then I wouldn't be worried. Check back in a week.
 

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1 hive with Saskatraz queen
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the feedback. I got into the hive today, which is 9 days since the last one. No eggs, no larvae, some capped brood but not a ton, 6-7 capped queen cells and a lot more honey. Found a queen, unsure if it’s the same as last inspection but she again was on a frame with no comb built out and this time running around somewhat frantically. There was also this very strange noise I heard coming from the frame the queen was on. It happened maybe 4 times while I had it out, I’m unable to attach the video I took 😔 I’m starting to get worried
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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Could be a virgin queen piping, they do this to locate other would be queens in the hive. So could be a good thing. Sound anything like this?
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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I am a little jealous right now, I have never got to witness piping first hand ( well once ) but it wasnt my first year. You have virgin queen and she is in the process of hunting down the other queen cells or emerged queens. Hopefully in a couple of weeks all your problems will be resolved. Hope all works out for you, let us know the outcome.
 

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Stay out of the hive! I know it is difficult, but it is essential to the requeening process. Can't say for sure but if it was initially a swarm or supercedure, interfering with the process once a queen has hatched can cause rejection of the queen and another supercedure.
The colony needs to get to know their new queen and have her pheromones spread within the hive. Everytime you open the hive, exposing them to sunlight, diluting her pheromones and invading them like a bear they blame the queen. I know that description is simplistic, but it is a way of thinking about it that most can relate to and understand why experienced beekeepers usually advise a hands off approach during requeening, especially supercedures. J
 

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1 hive with Saskatraz queen
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Stay out of the hive! I know it is difficult, but it is essential to the requeening process. Can't say for sure but if it was initially a swarm or supercedure, interfering with the process once a queen has hatched can cause rejection of the queen and another supercedure.
The colony needs to get to know their new queen and have her pheromones spread within the hive. Everytime you open the hive, exposing them to sunlight, diluting her pheromones and invading them like a bear they blame the queen. I know that description is simplistic, but it is a way of thinking about it that most can relate to and understand why experienced beekeepers usually advise a hands off approach during requeening, especially supercedures. J
That's interesting because when I got in on July 11th, I had spotted a new queen that seemed to be accepted by the workers (they appeared to be attending to her). But then when I got in this last time the queen I found was running around like crazy and the workers didn't seem to notice or care. I wonder if I caused them to reject the first queen I saw. It is really difficult to stay out, I just want to help them but if that's what's best then I'll keep my distance. Thanks for the advice! Do you recommend a certain amount of time to stay out? 2-3 weeks?
 

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Survivor stock & Buckfast in Langstroth 8F’s
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I would go with two week’s, at that time go into the hive, but not as to do an inspection or find a queen. Look for eggs, as soon as you locate freshly layed eggs, shut it back up and give her another two weeks at that time you can spend a little more time in the hive without risking your new queen.
 
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