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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my first year as a beekeeper and its been a bit of a mixed bag.
I wasn't able to harvest any honey this year, not sure if the Georgia weather had something to do with that, and the bees didnt fill all the frames .
The queens laying pattern hasn't been great, very patchy and quite weak.
After a two week break i opened the hive this week to find that there are very few eggs being layed. To top off the misery there was a ****roach running around, a dead hornet and 80-100 dead bees.

Now im worried that i wont have enough of a hive to get me through winter.
Should i replace the queen now or should i give her a week to settle down and start laying again?

Ive been feeding for the past week and have now put the entrance reducer in place. Is that enough?

any help for this Newbie would be appreciated
 

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I would say requeen now. You have done the right thing so far reduce the entrance and feed. Spotty laying isnt a good queen.
 

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That's a very sick hive, and it is in a lot of trouble. Depending on your local climate, it might be too late for any success, so check with locals, but to rescue it you need to;
-Treat for mites
-Add a frame or 2 of brood and nurses from a healthy hive.
-feed it
-Requeen it

Or if it's too late per the locals, cut your losses now (Better to take your losses in the fall than in the spring) and start off with a new locally made package or nuc in the spring.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Barnyard Bees is just an hour and a half north of you. Might be worth the trip to pick up a new queen and an OAV vaporizer.
 

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>The queens laying pattern hasn't been great, very patchy and quite weak.

Would you say the pattern is spotty?

A hive that does not expand during a flow has a problem. Post pictures of your brood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
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I quickly treated for mites, with great success, but the overall situation has not greatly improved. I have been feeding away from the hive, hoping to keep robbing bees away, there has been a lot of activity and the bees look pretty healthy (no deformed wings etc)
To compound my worries I am seeing some wax moths. I’ve removed as many frames as possible and replaced with New unused frames.
The queen is still not laying much and I suspect I am fighting a lost cause. But I will fight till the end!!!!
I’m now thinking I should remove what is good and place in a 5 frame Nuc. Just to try preserve something and hopefully give the queen the opportunity to start fresh.
Any thoughts on that?

Background
I purchased the bees in September 2017 as a Nuc. Built them up quickly and made it through the winter with a pretty strong group. They started to multiply well until mid summer and then the queen slowed up.
Luckily the weather here in Atlanta is still good and the temperatures are still in the 80’s. I hope this will buy me some time to get back on track
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Empty foundation is no good in the winter. Condense the hive to a nuc, put a robbing screen on them and a mason jar feeder on top or a baggie feeder. How did you treat? A strip of Apivar will get the bees through winter mitewise, if the hive is not already doomed. Requeening may still be in order. There is no guarantee that your current queen is last year's performer, unless she is marked of course.
 
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