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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, inspected my hive on July 4 and did not find the Queen, brood or eggs. There did not seem to be enough bees in the hive either. I went through every frame and did not notice any queen cells. I went out and bought a Queen from a local apiary and installed her that day. I added a couple of frames of brood from another hive and a couple of frames of honey.
I was leaving on a trip the next day so I could not check to see if she was released until I returned today, 7/12. When doing the inspection today, I found some of the brood from the second hive still capped, and the newly installed Queen still in the cage. I release the queen and inspected a couple of other frames. I found what appeared to be a couple of queen cells.
After 8 days, the new queen was not released by the other bees. My questions are,

Is that normal that the queen would not be released after that much time?
Why would there be queen cells if a new queen was introduced to the hive?
What are the chances that the new queen will be rejected?
Should I leave the queen cells if the new queen is accepted?
Does this sound like the hive swarmed?

I really appreciate any input and would like to understand more about what happened. This is my second year as a beekeeper so I am still very much a noob. Any information that may seem obvious or very simple would still be a great benefit. Thank you in advance!
 

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They've likely decided to make their own queen, the new released one will likely be killed (if not already) unless you get the queen cells out. If the new queen is accepted they'll tear down the queen cells on their own but it doesn't usually take 8 days to release a queen from a cage.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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Is that normal that the queen would not be released after that much time? a queen showing up via a gloved hand in a cadge, with a candy blocker is not "normal" for the bees, for us maybe.

Why would there be queen cells if a new queen was introduced to the hive? they "thought" they needed one, or the pheromones
were not strong enough. maybe started before you introduced

What are the chances that the new queen will be rejected? high IMO greater that 50% unless steps are taken.

Should I leave the queen cells if the new queen is accepted? no, I would remove asap if you want that queen accepted.

Does this sound like the hive swarmed? not really, a "strong" hive swarms , you describe a weak hive, could be a virus collapse, queen failure, or something else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for your reply. As a new bee keeper any input is very welcome, needed and appreciated. The hive seemed to be strong before this last inspection when I found no brood or eggs. The characteristics of the hive before losing the Queen were very good. If I leave the queen cells in the hive and the bees decide to go with the queen they raised, I understand I’ll lose the queen I paid for. Is there any other downside to leaving the new queen and the queen cells besides losing the money I paid for the queen? If I leave both, would that be like “hedging my bet” and increasing my chances of one or the other surviving, or will that increase the chance that I’ll lose both?

Is that normal that the queen would not be released after that much time? a queen



showing up via a gloved hand in a cadge, with a candy blocker is not "normal" for the bees, for us maybe.

Why would there be queen cells if a new queen was introduced to the hive? they "thought" they needed one, or the pheromones
were not strong enough. maybe started before you introduced

What are the chances that the new queen will be rejected? high IMO greater that 50% unless steps are taken.

Should I leave the queen cells if the new queen is accepted? no, I would remove asap if you want that queen accepted.

Does this sound like the hive swarmed? not really, a "strong" hive swarms , you describe a weak hive, could be a virus collapse, queen failure, or something else.
 

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jshannon,

leaving both is an option.

if you have enough bees one could leave all the cells in one hive , take a couple frames and the New Queen to another. WIth out options the Queen cell "less" part would be more likely to accept the queen and she would start laying.
IF the cells do not hatch (false queen cells) or they do not get mated (weather) or the winner of the fight to death gets lost or eaten by a bird or dragon fly....several options, you then have the purchased queen to fall back on.

Leaving them together, the bees or virgin could kill the "strange" queen then the new one fail to return to the hive properly mated.

you would of course then need a second top bottom and hive box. or a NUC setup
separating them would be the hedge, together you are guaranteed one takes the other out.

Apart is a better hedge, IMO

As is should work, up to you. also IF both work you can in 4 weeks combine keeping the queen you feel is better.

GG
 

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Thank you for your reply. As a new bee keeper any input is very welcome, needed and appreciated. The hive seemed to be strong before this last inspection when I found no brood or eggs. The characteristics of the hive before losing the Queen were very good. If I leave the queen cells in the hive and the bees decide to go with the queen they raised, I understand I’ll lose the queen I paid for. Is there any other downside to leaving the new queen and the queen cells besides losing the money I paid for the queen? If I leave both, would that be like “hedging my bet” and increasing my chances of one or the other surviving, or will that increase the chance that I’ll lose both?
Do you know the queen you bought is still alive? I split my main hive this year and failed to find some queen cells on one of the frames. After 5 days of not being released I hand released my purchased queen only to see her immediately balled and killed. I left the queen cells alone and now have 2 successful splits with the splits making their own queens. If your bought queen was accepted and still alive I'd just scrape off the other queen cells (if the bees don't tear them down) and leave it at that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Do you know the queen you bought is still alive? I split my main hive this year and failed to find some queen cells on one of the frames. After 5 days of not being released I hand released my purchased queen only to see her immediately balled and killed. I left the queen cells alone and now have 2 successful splits with the splits making their own queens. If your bought queen was accepted and still alive I'd just scrape off the other queen cells (if the bees don't tear them down) and leave it at that.
Found the new queen still alive. Guess she was accepted after all
 
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