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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A thought I just had.

Would I get better fed queens if I grafted, then a couple of days later after it has been fed royal jelly, I remove the larva from the cup, leaving as much royal jelly as possible, and graft a new just hatched larva? Would the bees continue to feed the second larvae even more jelly?
 

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It is called double grafting, but I have read that it provides no benefit over the standard method of grafting.
 

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It is called double grafting, but I have read that it provides no benefit over the standard method of grafting.

Ditto. I am reading 'Rearing Queen Honey Bees' by Roger Morse and he said exactly that. He said that to his knowledge, at the time he wrote the book (circa 1979), no one had done any research to verify that. He went on to say, "I suggest that double grafting is not worth the extra time involved; good results can be obtained without resorting to this method."
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Interesting. Thanks for the feedback. I had never heard of double grafting, it was just a crazy idea that popped into my head and I wondered if it would work.
 

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You could get the same results with less work by pre-priming the cell cups with royal jelly as you graft. Although, I myself don't think that pre-priming the cells makes any better queens than just dry grafting. It does seem to make it easier to release the larva from the grafting tool if there is a little royal jelly in the cell grafting into though. However, using a Chinese grafting tool seems to work very well with just doing dry grafting.
 

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Kamon has a video out where he pre-primes the grafting cups with RJ from a sacrificial queen cell. I thought it was interesting.
 

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Read one time and I don't remember where, that when a graft pre-primed with royal jelly was put in a observation hive the bees immediately removed the royal jelly and replaced it with new RJ. I have also read a couple of circa 70's papers that did the double grafting. Back then it seemed like this method may have been the norm, but after they didn't do it a few times they observed no difference in the quality of the queens and the double grafting was no longer recommended.
 

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I've experimented with saving royal jelly and priming them, double grafting and grafting with the chinese grafting tool. I don't see any difference in the outcomes. It's much less work and worry to just graft with the chinese grafting tool. It picks up some royal jelly and that seems to be sufficient.
 
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