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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If a queen is removed from a productive hive, is it more probable that a laying worker will take over than that they will make a new queen? also, how long after a mated queen is released from her cage does she normally start laying?
 

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>If a queen is removed from a productive hive, is it more probable that a laying worker will take over than that they will make a new queen?

its not terribly probable with a productive hive, they should have the resources to make a new queen if they truly are productive.


>also, how long after a mated queen is released from her cage does she normally start laying?

as soon as they get out of her way
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>If a queen is removed from a productive hive, is it more probable that a laying worker will take over than that they will make a new queen?

They will attempt to make a new queen and they will most often succeed. She will most often mate successfully and start laying. Of course sometimes she hits someone’s windshield on the way back.


>also, how long after a mated queen is released from her cage does she normally start laying?

Anywhere from immediately to a week or two later. I think it depends on how long she's been banked somewhere and not laying.
 

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I split 4 heavy hives with Double screen with the old queen in bottom.The cells were ready to hatch.I got back in 17 days and each hive had 1 3/4 deep super of capt brood,and another of yong brood.We only had 4 days of mating weather.I would guess also,its part of genetic.I've got 7 hives here out foraging at 8 above.No great numbers,but goig,in between the rains.
 

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I had 6 brood,then,1 poolen,and 1 honey,and one empty and feed the snot into them,in one week add another super,keep feeding.I'm talking deep supers but shallow works the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
wow, i did mine with only 4 frames of brood/pollen/honey. do you think there is a critical mass required for the split to work? in other words, do you think you could make a split with one frame of brood, as long as weather is warm and no need for bees to keep larvae warm?
 

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Well Sarah, it's also important to look at it from the stand point of how much space are you giving them to keep warm/humid??? If you put this in a 4 frame nuc or smaller, then your chances are greater for success. I recently built what I was aiming for to be a 5 frame nuc, but when it was done it's a 6 frame. Better than a 10 frame box I guess.
 

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<do you think you could make a split with one frame of brood, as long as weather is warm and no need for bees to keep larvae warm?>

If you don't have enough to keep the larvae warm, You can't increase the numbers in the split. Less than critical mass. Guessing an answer to your questions; depending on temperature, breed, foraging, etc. two medium frames with accompanying bees. One brood and one food. This answer is just to give you a place to start thinking. Really general.

Hawk
 
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