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Discussion Starter #1
After looking at several You Tube videos of bee installations I notice that several people put their queen in the hive to release later. We were taught at the University to do a direct release of the queen that comes in our package (after we shake the bees into the hive). It was my understanding that you do a direct release of the queen when you receive a bee package and then next year, after I divide my hive and order a queen, then the queen is placed in her box inside the hive only to be released slowly after the bees accept her. Is that correct? Should I anticipate any problems directly releasing the queen after I install the bees on Thursday?
 

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This is my first year keeping bees, so don't think I'm giving expert advice here... This is just what makes sense to me.

When you put a new queen in an established (but queenless) hive, it seems to be the practice to release her after three or four days if the bees haven't done so.

A package of bees has usually been exposed to the queen at least a few days, maybe a week or slightly more. They know her. I can't see that immediate release of a package queen is any different than leaving a new queen in an established hive for three days and then releasing her.

OTOH, it may be safer to let the package bees get used to their new home before letting them get at the queen. Just sort of give them a chance to settle in before releasing her so she doesn't get blamed for the disruption. Based on that thought, I chose to leave my queen in her cage, expose the candy, and check on her three days later (as in: I can't wait to get off work so I can go home and see if they've let her out!). I think it might be an unnecessary precaution, but I'm playing it safe.
 

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I'd bee on the safe side and remove the cork from the candy end and place the cage in the hive. True they have been together for days, they know each other but have you ever heard of the whole package leaving the hive right after they are dumped? They won't go without the q and two days later they'll be all comfy at their new home.
That's just my opinion but its based on more than reading material.:D
 

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Just another opinion. I have never lost a queen or the package. It may be better safe than sorry. I too expose the candy, take one frame out and thumb tack the queen box in its place. Two or so days later, if she is still in there, I'll break through the candy, put her box back and let her come out at her leisure. The next day she's always out and away we go.
 

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I always release the queen. Never had any issues.
 

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i seen bee keepers have problems with bees accepting queens my way has been with a intro gage this is where you make you one from screen like a squrie put your queen and some nurse bees in it this way she can start laying eggs it works very good for me just push it in your foundtion come back 2 days later take the gage out and she will do good
 

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Here is SC. We have packages that have been shook on Friday and delivered to customers on Sat. Direct release will most likely result in a dead queen or a lost package. So I would rather be safe than sorry :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm assuming our queen is with her bees for several days. They are shipped in from California to a company here in MN. So definitely on a truck for 3-4 days? Would that be sufficient for good relations between bees and queen?
 

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Soap Pixie: there are good reasons why the package suppliers furnish queens in cages! The best option is always go conservative and let the bees get accustomed to the queen before she is released. Pull the candy plug and place the cage in the hive between 2 frames and let the bees release your queen. They'll release her in 1-3 days, it works 98% of the time, and you don't lose anything in the process. Why try to short circuit a proven system?
 

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In my opinion there are more problems caused by leaving the queen cage in than by direct releasing the queen. ESPECIALLY if one is using foundationless or top bar hives but even with foundation, the newbee often finds an extra comb hanging off the queen cage.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beespackages.htm
 
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