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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Alright fellas, picked up two nucs a couple weeks ago and they are installed into my newly made hives. Did an inspection last week and this week as well. Been watching them building up everyday by peeking under the SBB at night. Also have been watching them a little during the day.

Hive 1 is building up much more quickly and since todays inspection already has 2 of my frames drawn out for the most part. They are much more busy during the day and takes alot of my syrup feed from the bag in the hive.

Hive 2 is not building up as quick and the cluster is much smaller. They have not even started to draw any new comb on my frames. Seem to be more lazy like and not consuming much of the syrup feed.

I spotted the queens in both hives today. I think hive 2 had what looked like supersedure cells. They are on the comb face and have a bowl like shape, not a peanut shape. I suppose I should consider going back in there and checking for any eggs or larva and remove them, or let them be and let the queen be replaced? These are frames I got with the nuc so I cannot tell if they were new cells or old cells. They don't look white but more dark gold colored wax.

With no one around me to consult, I have to come here and ask you guys. I don't see much of anything else out of the ordinary when inspecting. Still have brood being laid in the cells. I keep putting off shaking the frames of the bees to look at a frame bare, but I just hate the idea of losing all the bees onto the ground. I could shake them back into the hive and they will still be okay, would'nt they?

My concern is that I'm wondering if I need to make a new queen from the other hive in a nuc box when I get the first chance and requeen that hive....
 

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Equalize populations by swapping their locations at mid day. Sounds like a lot of bees drifted from one colony to the other. Brood can only be raised in areas of a hive that are 93 degrees. I am sure the SBB you are peeking up thru is not too helpful on those cold nights in the bees maintaining that temperature. Ditch it. Your bees may or may not supercede their queen. Let them decide. Minimize your visits inside until your bees gain strength or they may never. When you find a frame of eggs and brood, you know things are going well and get out. Good luck.
 

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'Agreed with Vance G.

You might just cover or partially close off that SBB for now. 'Sounds as if they mostly just need more time.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Does it make a difference that I marked the hives to distinguish them from one another? I painted an X on one and an O on the other so they could be oriented...

I made my own SBB so it allows me to have a plywood insert. I suppose I will put them in until it warms up more...

The other thing is, I suppose after more reading, I'am having a hard time figuring it out. I will post up a pic soon so maybe I can get a definitive answer.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Alright, so the quality may not be very good, but they were screenshots off the video I took.





What they be, my fellow keepers?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Anybody?


I could not resist last night and opened up the hive. Took the frame out and tore them down. Did not have any jelly or eggs in it. So I dunno if it was a planned thing by the bees, or they were old cells.
 

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What they be, my fellow keepers?
Queen cells (look like supercedure or emergency).

I would leave them in and let your bees decide who gets to stay as queen, since they are better at raising good queens than we are. Or you could split and use the cells elsewhere, or tear them down. However if they are supercedure, they could supercede again.
 
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