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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My package was hived a month ago, it has two brood boxes. There is only one frame with eggs in the bottom box and the space old brood has emerged from is getting filled with food. The top box is filled with brood. Is this bad? Should I put the queen in the bottom box and run a queen excluder? Thanks.
 

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If I was keeping bees in California, I am pretty sure I would run a single deep for a brood nest. So I would consolidate all brood in that bottom deep and put on a queen excluder and a super for honey storage. But my objective is a honey crop. I fail to understand, but that doesn't seem to be an objective for many.
 

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Are you running deeps? If so, a month is way too soon to be stretching the bees that far. Keep in mind 3 lbs of bees cover about 5 frames. You've given them 20.

Being coastal like myself I run single deeps all year round.

The reason they are in the top box is because that's where all the warmth is as they don't have the numbers to keep 2 warm.

Take away the bottom box and run the single deep. You also wanted honey this year and a single deep might get you there, but again, asking a lot out of a package especially as we enter our dry season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok, so move all frames with brood into the bottom box, and the rest in the top box above the excluder? Yes I'm running deeps and I'm using 8 frames but I doubt that makes a difference.

A question I have about using a single brood chamber is why do people use one deep above the excluder and then their suppers?
 

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I run both 8 and 10 frame. The 8 works as a single brood but you have to keep an eye on things next year as the colony grows. If you don't remove any honey frames, giving the queen room to lay, they can get a little swarmy. It seems to work slightly better on 10 frame, but not much better. I will say there is something very satisfying about a single box full of brood from one edge to the other. It also makes it a lot easier to manage the nest and finding the queen, only have 8-10 frames to look through.

I run a single deep, excluder, then mediums for the supers. You may opt to run a deep as a super to move honey frames into, it doesn't really matter. The only reason people run mediums for honey is that honey is HEAVY! I lifted two mediums full of honey yesterday and nearly dropped them...and I'm a pretty fit guy with rock climber fingers.

So you can move anything with brood down, and anything with honey/nectar above the excluder. However, if they only have 10 frames drawn I'd just remove the second deep altogether.

Our flow is slowing down here. How's it looking up your way?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks. I'll take this advise. I don't really know how to judge a flow... but there was a big boom in blooming but it's dying down now. Is that what you mean?
 

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Yes, how much nectar you have coming into the hive. Our coastal flow is usually Dec-May. My hives are packed with capped honey and I'll likely harvest in the next month.

Your goal as a new beekeeper should be to keep them alive for next years flow. Honey is cheap compared to how much you have invested into your hive.

Plus, healthy bees make a lot of honey. Just try and stop them :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
mtnmyke, does the flow not usually pickup again with the blackberry bloom around your/our area? Where I live there is no lack of un-kept drugy lawns stuffed with Blackberrys lol.
 

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Our blackberry is blooming right now and slows down in the coming month. You likely get a slightly longer season than me, getting a little more rainfall, but likely not much longer.
 
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