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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to mark the Queen but don't know the way to go about it.

Should I do it right in the hive or remove her?
What should I mark her with?
I've thought white out might work.
I also have White appliance enamel and liquid gun sight illuminator in day glo orange..

They all smell pretty toxic to me. What is normally used?
Please understand I'm in a remote 3rd world place so going to the bee store is not an option.
Much Thanks Beeks.
 

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I use Testors model paint. You will have to find a way to make the queen immobile while you apply the paint and let it dry. Your hands will work for that.
 

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Practice on drones first. Practice picking up the drones w/ two fingers and then w/ both hands turn the drone around so you can get to the thorax w/ a marking pen or whiteout brush or fingernail polish brush.

Do this right at the hive. Doing drones first will give you some feel for handling queens by hand and give you confidence that you can do so w/out crushing her.

Try the illuminator day glo orange on the drones and keep them in a jar for a day and see if they die. If not, use it on your queen.

Welcome to the forum from Belize. Where do you have your bees? In your back yard or out in the bush? European or Africanized?

Nice video.
 

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I use the Crayola non toxic fluorescent pens from Wal*Mart. They work fine, and they are inexpensive. I think blue is this years color, last year it was green.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We have both Africanized and Europeans in our area.
I cant buy nucs so I rely on swarms, cutouts and traps. This makes for exiting beekeeping.
I can usually tell the type of bee by there initial reaction to my approach. The africans in the surrounding villages are hostile and will really try to kill you, even with smoke. The bees I keep here are docile Europeans whom I can work most times without smoke.
The Africans kill people every year since I've been here but there main population seems to be around a village five miles away. I don't collect from that area.
I have my hives 500 yds in the bush near my home and have never had a problem.

Although Two nights ago our Germen Sheppard dog got severly Skunkatized,
Have to watch the skunk doesn't develop a taste for my bees.:)
 

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Great how to video, thanks for sharing.
 

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Just starting out and have found the youtube thing is great for learning.
do a search on there and you can spend hours,

Glad everyone enjoyed
 

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thanks for the vid....

i always had the impression you had to have the little foam container thing to trap her in.... I guess not....
 

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i always had the impression you had to have the little foam container thing to trap her in...
I find it is a handy tool to have. I also have the "hair clip" queen catcher, but I don't seem to have the knack for getting the queen inside without pinching some passers-by. Then the is the bother of getting her from the hair-clip into the marking tube.

I found it easier to just put the open tube in front of her and herd her in with my finger tip.

Beecurious has a great alternative to the five or six bucks I paid for mine.

Wayne
 

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I found it easier to just put the open tube in front of her and herd her in with my finger tip.
That works. Another trick is to take the foam pad on the end of the stick and nudge her from the side. She will usually naturally grab on to the foam. You don't need to push hard, just press against her side as she walks along.

Very young queens may just drop off of the frame when you nudge them though so hold the frame over the mating nuc or hive. Older queens are slower and just grab on easily.

I have also used a piece of burr comb to have her walk up on that and then get her in the marking tube (I use the same methods to get them into the Jenter hole).

I suppose that I should just get used to grabbing her with my hand, but I always seem too nervous for that, even though grabbing drones doesn't bother me. I guess grabbing a queen wrong is more of a problem than a drone.
 

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thanks for the vid....

i always had the impression you had to have the little foam container thing to trap her in.... I guess not....
Nope, those things are relativily new. Not that I really know when they were developed.

Like not wearing gloves unless i need to, I like to handle queens by hand. And I don't like frame grabbers for similar reasons. If I have the frame in my hand I'm pretty sure that I'm not going to drop it. Can't say the same w/ a frame grabber.
 

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First, get next year's color and catch drones and practice, practice practice. When you get good at drones, try workers. When you get good at workers, try a queen. It should be second nature by the time you try a queen. Whatever method you use, practice is the key. I do some by hand and some with a tube and a catcher. Either way you can injure a queen if you're not careful. But you also have to be quick enough while being careful...
 

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I have marked queens by hand, but I have never really got used to it. I actually like the tube because I can put her in there, go a little way from the hive and get everything ready. Then after marking I can let her sit in there for a minute or two while the paint dries.

I suppose if I was doing hundreds of queens a week, I would do them by hand, but if have to open the paint lid, find a properly sized piece of grass and dab most of the paint off so I don't get too much on her. It is a lot easier to do this while she is in the tube than when she is in my hand. At least for me.
 

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I marked mine yesterday. I put smoke on my hands before I started picking up frames. I don't know if it matters ,but it makes me feel better. I spotted her on the third drawn frame and she started to trot. Two frames later I had her in my hand . After I had her marked I was kind of killing time for the mark to set,and she wiggled out of my hand. oop's I looked in the hive bottom hoping I had dropped back in, but no dice. Next I started looking on the ground. After about 30 sec. I found her and put everything back together.
Next time I'm going to have a hair curler cage rite next to me.
 

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I think that the hair curler cage is ingenious for her to dry in. Problem is I can't find any woman that ever seen or heard of such a thing. While I never used hair rollers, neither have I. I did see the one in the video so I know that there really is such a contraption. Could someone tell me where I might acquire one?
 

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This http://www.beeworks.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=10&products_id=124
is by far the easiest, quickest, and safest method to mark a queen that I have found.

The push-in cage traps her against the comb and she never leaves the comb.

I have lost queens (flying away and smashing her) in the transfer to and from a marking tube. I have never lost a queen while marking her with this push-in ring. Just leave her in the ring until the paint dries.
 

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Galaxy, How do you keep from killing workers with this? Do you need to isolate her?
 
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