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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a hive that has become queen less, we are not sure when this happened but there seems to be no developing larva visible and absolutely no eggs. However there is still capped brood present .
Our weather has been cold and wet for weeks so we have not been able to get into the hives until last night.
There appears to be what I think are two queen cells on one frame.
My question is, let them go and hope a new queen is born in time to save them from a laying worker?... or get a new queen ASAP?
Any advice would be truly appreciated!!
 

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If there are two queen cells on a frame let them go and create their own queen. Do you have other hives? If so I'd recommend giving them a frame of brood and eggs to keep the population steady as the new queen comes on board. The other thing is that if there's another problem they can make a queen out of one of the eggs you introduced.
 

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There appears to be what I think are two queen cells on one frame. My question is, let them go and hope a new queen is born in time to save them from a laying worker?... or get a new queen ASAP?
Any advice would be truly appreciated!!
Depends on what the queen cell looks like. Is it capped? Is it about the length of your pinkie toe? Does it look like a peanut shell hanging vertical? If it looks similar to all the above, then I'd say leave it, and do not disturb that colony for at least 3-4 weeks from today. Then afterwards, go back and check for eggs in cells, that should give her enough time (from this point forward) to get mated and lay.

If you see open cups only it may be a queen (worker larva), OR....

It could be a queen cup made over a drone larva. I call these "drag" queens and they never develop far enough to get capped, but the bees will create a random queen cell over one of their little brothers almost in an act of desperation. In this case you may also have laying workers, then your problem will not be solved easily, even if you get a queen. But let's take one step at a time, and let us know.
 

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You may want to call Queen Rite Colonies in Spencer, Oh. and see if they have queens available. 440-647-2602

Three hours of driving may save you a lot of headache.
 

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It almost sounds like the hive swarmed. Some of the things you have described can be seen in hives that have swarmed. For instance capped and emerging brood only, no eggs, existing queen cells. However there are usually more queen cells then two when a hive swarms. The bees could have superceded also, and are awaiting the arrival of a new queen. What do the "queen cells" look like. They should look very similar to peanuts.
 

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Don't panic and get a queen just yet. She could end up being killed if the queen cells you talk about are indeed ripe and ready to pop. If the cells are like peanuts I would save your money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks to all for your help and advice.
I have some pics of the cells in question but cant seem to figure out how to post them.
Went into the hive tonight just to have another look and 2 of the cells in question have been uncapped, oh ya, there was more than 2 just so many bees I missed them yesterday. This hive was from a package that was hived on April 14 on all new gear. The cells don't look quite as big as queen cells I've seen on the net but this is only our 2nd year and we have never had this type problem before. If I can figure out how to post the pics I'll get them on asap.
Thanks again,
Chris&Kristal
 
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