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Hi ...I have a new hive that seems like it is doing well. This hive has an 8 frame brood box that has only two frames of brood and the rest of the brood is in the the two supers that are on top of the brood box. There is honey in there as well just lots of brood in those supers. Now the brood box does not have much in it besides a frame or two of some brood (and not much) and a frame of honey. It is my understanding that the bees always work upwards. How can I get the queen to go back into the brood box and lay and not in my supers. I really do not want to use a queen excluder because I usually cannot find the queen. Any suggestions would be great. Reversing boxes? Let me know what you think.
 

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You don't really give much information about the total configuration of your hive. One thing you may consider - if your frames are all the same depth, medium or deep, it is really not very difficult to move them around to be where you want them. If you want all the brood combs to be in the bottom-most super, simply move them there. One of the best reasons for movable frames, is just that, they are movable. However, if your frames are different depths, and you want the brood to be in the bottom box, which is presently on the bottom, simply move it to the top, permanently or temporarily. Once the queen has again begun using it for brood, move it back down.

Medium depth frames will fit into deep supers (and if they stay there long enough the bees will add comb to fill the extra space), and deep frames will fit into two medium supers, stacked together, or a medium frame with a three inch high spacing rim.
 

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Joseph gave some really good advice.

One thing that you can do to find your queen is use the excluder. Put it directly above your deep in the current configuration, with your supers on top. Wait a minimum of 3-4 days. Inspect your hives again. The side of the excluder that has eggs will be the side that contains the queen.
 

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Leave it alone, the queen will move down. I agree with you on the resistance to using a queen excluder (around here we call them honey excluders). The bees tend to do things the way they want but I have heard of people having luck using a small section that separates brood boxes from honey supers (4" seems to be the common size) but be on the watch for the bees building comb on the bottom of the frames above the spacer.

Personally, I don't worry about it too much, when I have queens lay in the honey supers they tend to lay in the center frame or 2, leaving the honey frames without brood and once I add a second honey super I can't say I've ever had a queen go into that.

I would not perform a box swap as that can result in the queen to stop laying for a short while but you could consider moving the brood frames from the honey box into the brood box. This isn't as disruptive as a box swap if you don't need to move too many frames but be sure to keep them together or the nursing bees might abandon a frame of brood.
 
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