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One of my hives lost their queen. I don't see much any brood cells anymore, just a very small amout, no eggs, no larve, but I do see two queen cells. One hatched one unhatched.

It's spring and this hive is about to hit the heavy necter flow, and I don't want to miss out. They survived the winter and damm it I want HONEY!!!.

I guess all I can do now is wait to see if the new queen mates and stars producing brood.

I was thinking of taking a frame of brood from another hive, one that has fresh eggs in it. Think that's a good idea - or best to wait?
 

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Taking a frame of brood with eggs from another hive will not hurt. Your hatched cell can mean a couple of things. One is your new queen is there but you didn't find her. She was out on a mating flight. Or that she went out on her mating flight and got missing, bird food or dead by other means. If she returns and starts laying the extra brood frame will just boost the hive. If she is gone the bees will know this and use it to raise a new queen.

Good luck ...keep us informed.
 

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If the population is strong you might get a good crop of honey, possibly better than if the queen was laying strong. See "A cut down split" at www.bushfarms.com/beessplits.

If not queen-right in 5-8 days, I would add a frame of eggs if you have one. This should give the new queen and the one in the cell time to get mated and laying before the new cells start to emerge (14 days+5-8 days). Of course, if you have a laying queen in 12 days, then great, you can cut out the new queen cells, if not then you should have some back up queen cells.

Choose a frame of the newest wax link to info on why. Your other hive is a valuable asset in this situation!!

Do not let more than a couple emerge or they could swarm. Pick the best 2 or 3 and squish the rest.

If they are very weak and are not queen-right in 10-12 days then I would consider combing them. This would also achieve your stated goal of honey production. You can always split them later and choose to buy or raise a queen.
Good luck!!

RKR
 
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