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im just wondering what people think about useing them ,i was told they are also called hunny excluders buy an old bee keeper.
 

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They can be if you don’t do this.
1. Reduce the bottom entrance to just a hole just large enough for a drone to get out . I usually use screen for this if the hive does not have a screened bottom board.
2. Take 3/8 inch strips of wood and apply on three sides of your queen excluder. This will make an entrance on one side of the excluder.

I started do this after reading a study that this method does not reduce honey production. Without an upper entrance the bees tend to store more honey in the brood chamber which will reduce the number of field bees.
 

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I use them to keep my extracting frames brood free, therefore no wax moth problems. I have one hive right now with at least seven mediums full of honey above the excluder.
 

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We too use excluders on all our hives. It is more a matter of expediency than anything else. If we waited til the brood was all cleared out we might not have time to feed for winter.
Oliver, wax moth will go in our broodless honey supers if we let them. Am I understanding you correctly?
Sheri
 

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I dont use them either. I want them to make as many bees as they will for the fall crop, and to winter with . They`ll cut back when its the right time. I am leaving an extra super on just for that and any open honey cells when I take honey off. But then I am a small hobbyist also...Rick
 

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Wax moths do not bother my honey super combs that have never have never had brood in them, and most have been in use since 1977. I store them in a garage with no moth protection. As soon as there are cocoons and pollen in a comb, watch out. Those I store on top of strong hives.
 

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Hey Nick!
What problems did you have with the plastic excluders?
Harry
 

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We use them on everything with the exception on this years nucs which are run in double beeps insted of being run as singles (like years previous). Last year we ran out & I ran 4 yards so about 100 hives excluderless & it was a fight when I came time to strip the honey off them & pain to extract. I could se no benefit what soever from not running them those yards did not have any sort of substantail per colony average. If anything at all they were actually a tad below average.
 

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We had some bees in ND that would not go through the plastic excluders and became stuck in them. It appeared that we possibly got a batch that weren't spaced right. The jury is still out will know more later.
 

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Were they from Dandant?
I hope not, as I just put 150 into service having always used wired excluders up till now.
Harry
 

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I personally did not like the plastic excluders, because after using them for a while they will get all out of shape and difficult to use. I prefer the all metal, because the wood framed excluders permit the bees to build burr comb that is messy when removing supers. I read where Michael Bush said that he extracted in his kitchen. He must not be producing much honey, or either he is a bachelar, or has a very understanding wife.
 

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I've also had Bees get stuck in plastic excluders and they seem not to want to pass through. I put an all metal one on one hive and none on another like hive to compare the results...will know in a week or so.......
 

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I've also had Bees get stuck in plastic excluders and they seem not to want to pass through. I put an all metal one on one hive and none on another like hive to compare the results...will know in a week or so.......
 

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Yes they were from Dadant but it wasn't all of them. It appeared to be boxes of them that were screwed up. I would definetly keep an eye on them. We lost some honey over the deal.
 

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The only time I use a 'queen excluder' turning it into a 'queen includer' is when I catch a swarm then I put it between the hive body and my sbb, I use shims, 3/8th raising just the front, between my brood chambers and honey supers and have yet to find any brood or queen in my supers.
So I guess, Harry, it is all in how you do it.
 
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