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they are a PITA to me. Not easy to clean and they are not easy to get off when propolised down. I have switched to all metal QEs now.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I read somewhere that some plastic QEs are hard on the wing of the foragers. The one plastic one I have seems smooth enough, but I chose to go all metal. I know the wires are smooth. I can also set the metal ones out for the bees to clean up, afraid a plastic one might warp like the plastic frame I accidentally left out in the sun.
 
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I have plastic ones right now because I bought them to experiment with. I will be switching over to metal as they break for the same reasons Aran listed. Plastic is cheap to experiment with if you want to see if they fit with your beekeeping methods.
 

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I have plastic ones more than 10 years old. They can warp a bit when you store them, if you don't lay them flat and put some weight on them (flip a cover upside down and put some boxes on). Cleaning is easy- get them cold and flex them.
 
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I read somewhere that some plastic QEs are hard on the wing of the foragers. The one plastic one I have seems smooth enough, but I chose to go all metal. I know the wires are smooth. I can also set the metal ones out for the bees to clean up, afraid a plastic one might warp like the plastic frame I accidentally left out in the sun.
You have to be a bit more careful when putting them on (or back on) that buildups on tops and bottoms of frames does not push some webs up or down from its neighbor. This results in stories that workers move eggs around.:rolleyes: Wire excluders can be distorted too but not as easily.
 

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Metal excluders are easier to remove for hive inspections. The plastic ones don't stay stiff and straight as you remove them, so bees get flung around when removing them as they are stuck down with wax and propolis, and they tend to snap as you lift them up. I prefer the all metal excluders myself.
 

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6a 4th yr 9 colonies inc. 2 resource hives
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Another thought process- We had a drought last year. Prior to that I had been using metal QE's. When I found them struggling with the QE in a drought year I pulled them. QE's can be super useful to be sure. But in my yard I'm happier without them. I don't need the harvest or income. Some would say your harvest will be better. I run a med/deep/med as my base unit and although my queens are in top med from winter, once I rotate to the bottom medium she will quickly move in and remain in the center deep as her preference even without the QE. (Barring crazy bee behavior)

Just throwing it out there as another tool in the toolbox of ideas.
 

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Metal excluders are easier to remove for hive inspections. The plastic ones don't stay stiff and straight as you remove them, so bees get flung around when removing them as they are stuck down with wax and propolis, and they tend to snap as you lift them up. I prefer the all metal excluders myself.
queen excluders or honey excluders????depends
 

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queen excluders or honey excluders????depends
For me they are queen excluders, as I get more honey using them than I do when not using them. Perhaps location flows make a difference, I do not get strong flows like some locations do.
 

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For me they are queen excluders, as I get more honey using them than I do when not using them. Perhaps location flows make a difference, I do not get strong flows like some locations do.
i get 2 strong flows a year. it depends on the hive, some get them some dont.
 
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