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It was tough to type the title for this question since it seems to always be a discussion.

I didn't use an excluder on one of my hives last year(2 deeps) just to see the results of honey storing compared to the hives with excluders. Sure enough, the 1st super(which had drawn frames) ended up having eggs laid in it at the bottom of the frames.

My question for this year is, if I go without an excluder again and a super of all drawn, what would a "non crossable" honey band look like that would keep the queen from moving up? They usually fill the middle frames with honey first and work out. Which although, creates a honey band in the center, leaves the area around the outer frames without a honey band allowing her to still get into the super?

So in short, what is the best approach(in keeping the queen out) when not using an excluder when the first super has drawn comb in it?

As you can probably guess, I am in the process of deciding the popular question for all my hives, to use an excluder or don't use one. Thanks, juzzer

BTW- I have a notched inner and open bottom for entrances.
 

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If not using an excluder, then just rotate the frames with eggs and youngest larva to the bottom box. This can be done by the box, just move the box with frames of the most eggs and youngest larva to the bottom of the hive stack. This keeps the broodnest low in the stack, and as honey flows come stronger and hive gets more populated, they'll end up filling boxes above the broodnest with honey.
 
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