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Is there research on putting a queen excluder on the bottom in early spring to help control the swarming?

I realize it is hard on the bees to have to go thru one all the time and there has to be problem with doing it but curious what it is??

I have lost big swarms two years in a row in early March when I am busy. Another problem is I do not want more than two hives in my neighborhood.

I had two of the strongest hives I have ever had this year and both started off strong. I messed on myself this year with the one poisoned hive ( lost 40-50% of the hive) which I nursed back fed and they swarmed in April even as weak as they were.

The other hive was full of bees and while I was gone for a couple of days probably 40-50% of the bees left even though I had checked ( obviously not often enough )and took out some queen cells the still took off.

Now I have well fare bees. both queens are laying but both hive are really weak though I the poisoned hive the queen started laying pretty well but the only swarmed hive has more bees but the queen is not really putting out full frames of eggs. For some reason she keeps moving around on the different frames???

What are the cons to having a bottom excluder if you not around all the time?

Yes I should have split them. But what are the alternatives? Last year I gave a couple of splits to a friend but he is on the other side of Houston and runs only mediums to boot. This year I did not have the time.

Have a great Spring and "bee" safe and stay well! JimD
 

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Drones plug it up, and a swarm queen is thinner, so she can probably get through anyway.
 

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65 colonies +/- mostly Langstroth mediums, a few deeps for nuc production
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A Queens thorax is what is to large to fit through the excluder, it is pretty hard and does not get smaller in prep for swarming. Her abdomen does but it is flexible anyway since she has to fit it into worker size cells.
If you have a queen small enough to fit through the excluder it is more likely to have been a result of poor feeding of the cells when she was a larvae. Or a defect in the excluder.
 

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A QE won't stop them from raising swarm cells and it also keeps drones in. If the queen can't get out then then either one of the emerged queens will kill her or she will kill it. Instead it's best to try and keep them from raising swarm cells to begin with.
 
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