Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is there such a thing as arbitrary length of queen excluder material? Perhaps by the roll, or otherwise? Or is it only available for 8 frame or 10 frame sizes specifically?
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
5,283 Posts
I've only seen QE's offered to fit 8,10 hives and 5 frame nucs. Never heard of a "roll" of QE material.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Yes - it's called plywood ...
LJ
I read about this one too. Seems that you use big holes or slots (9mm and 12mm) that the queen can, in fact, pass through, but because of where they are around the perimeter she doesn't. An alternative was a piece of feed sack cut slightly smaller that the hive area...

Never would imagined you could just do something and she simply wouldn't "want" to go through.

Well, no matter. I just saw how it was done using regular sized ones in a way I simply hadn't expected. Makes all the sense in the world now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,324 Posts
The beauty of plywood is that a) you can make them for free (assuming you have the plywood, of course), and any size and shape you want, and b) there isn't the same issue with propolis build-up found with wooden-rimmed metal QX's.

Thinking back to when you first started this series of questions, with any Horizontal Hive a simple dummy frame hanging down will act as a QX. Perhaps the best example of this is in the Die Bienenkiste Hive design, where a piece of wood - strategically placed - acts as a permanently installed Queen Excluder, without the restriction to forager activity which is so often seen with metal excluders. So they don't even need to be made of plywood :)
.
I've tried this method of QX-ing myself, and it works fine - although I wouldn't rely on plywood or any other form of wooden board to keep two queens apart.
LJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
The beauty of plywood is that a) you can make them for free (assuming you have the plywood, of course), and any size and shape you want, and b) there isn't the same issue with propolis build-up found with wooden-rimmed metal QX's.

Thinking back to when you first started this series of questions, with any Horizontal Hive a simple dummy frame hanging down will act as a QX. Perhaps the best example of this is in the Die Bienenkiste Hive design, where a piece of wood - strategically placed - acts as a permanently installed Queen Excluder, without the restriction to forager activity which is so often seen with metal excluders. So they don't even need to be made of plywood :)
.
I've tried this method of QX-ing myself, and it works fine - although I wouldn't rely on plywood or any other form of wooden board to keep two queens apart.
LJ
True enough. I was watching a few different things where people were doing multiple queen hives where the box sizes were somewhat relative but not 1:1. So you might have 2 boxes on top of 3 across or 1 box on top of 2 or even 1 box between 2 across but just in the middle. I was initialy thinking, wow, how does someone come up with that odd shape of QX, but I finally saw where they put it in place, or tore it down... and realized that what they were using was simply relative to the particular box, be it the bottom of the box above, or the top of the box below. So what I was thinking was a problem, wasn't really. I just hadn't seen how they actually did it until after I already asked the question. And since I am working on getting the reputation of the one who asks all the stupid questions, I felt no compulsion to figure out how to delete the question. :) :D

As for QX at all, I haven't really been all that interested in their use except when I started reading about the prospect of single chamber brood nesting. Where it seems to be used as a tool to help in setting the situation up. Then later in lots of the how-tos for queens and splits, uses for sequestering queens, or what have you. So there's that. In any event, seems like a tool that has its place. I have an 8 frame one that I bought, and a 10 frame one that I won :) Don't have any 10 frame equipment, but I have used it on top of my rack, instead of laying boxes and supers on the ground. I do figure, if I am going to move into managing things with some different sized equipment, I might need a few more. At least for 5 frame. And with availability to have one per hive at least once I start building other stacks.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top