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Discussion Starter #1
The smallest of our two hives was just found to contain three "peanuts" - queen cells and want suggestions on what we should do. Didn't see queen, but we didn't see queen in other hive either.

Also, what's a swarm cell?
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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Where are the cells? How big is the hive (in terms of frames of bees)? Three is a pretty small number for swarm cells. Swarm cells are almost always on the bottom of the combs. Supercedure cells are almost always up in the middle or higher. Emergecy cells are all over.

A swarm cell is a queen cell near the bottom in circumstances that appear to be a plan, on the bees' part, to swarm. A queen cell is more than just a queen cup (longer and has a larvae and food in it or it's capped).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hive consists 3 to 4 frames of bees.
Peanuts are all at bottom of frame.
This hive has not been nearly as active as the other, but we've seen no mites, beetles, etc. Only ants carrying their (ant) eggs out of the hive when we were smoking/inspecting last time.
We did not see anything that appeared to be an ant hill/nest in the hive.
 

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Thanks for your kind attention. They are completely enclosed, like an unopened shell, and I have no clue as to presence of larvae. The two lowest are attached to foundation just above the bottom of frame and angle downward. The third, a little higher up (and not nearly as long) is almost (if not exactly) horizontal to foundation.
 

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>Thanks for your kind attention. They are completely enclosed, like an unopened shell

Then they are capped.

>and I have no clue as to presence of larvae

They wouldn't be capped without larvae.

>The two lowest are attached to foundation just above the bottom of frame and angle downward. The third, a little higher up (and not nearly as long) is almost (if not exactly) horizontal to foundation.

If it's horizontal it's drone. If they others are smooth and similar in size, I'd be tempted to assume they are drone also. Queen cells are vertical and are gnarly on the outside like a peanut, not smooth like a drone cell.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Just so; as I said in original post, they're all "peanuts." (Sorry to go on laboring this.)

It occurs to me, since its a rather small bunch and we found very little brood (compared to the other hive,) the ladies know they need a replacement; in which case, we should just let 'em go about it! (?)
 
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