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I am interested in the forum members' experience with the relationship between queen cell size and the quality of the queen. In my experience, I have seen quite a variance in the size of supersedure and swarm cells and often wondered when culling if the bigger cells made better queens.
 

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I have read about and experienced the notion that the size of the cell is not a reliable predictor of the size or quality of the resultant queen. A few weeks ago I had a huge supersedure cell that produced a small queen. Have grafted some larvae too. Have had larger queens from physically small cells. It is the nutrition that you can depend on to produce the best queens. Recently saw a huge capped queen cell that was empty. :mystery: HTH :)
 

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>I am interested in the forum members' experience with the relationship between queen cell size and the quality of the queen.

Since the size of the queen doesn't matter:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21870968

I would guess the size of the cell doesn't either. That would be my observation.
 

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I been raising a few queen cells for nucs and have noticed something similiar.
I put a queen cell in the nuc, it hatches and i do a check on the nuc. The queen looks kind of small and i think to myself did my starter or finisher provide enough for the cells?

Anyway a queens a queen right?

I go back and check in a couple of weeks the queen is laying fine and she has grown into a decent sized queen.

I guess after mating the back end of the queen enlarges a considerable amount.

G.
 

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I was just about to post something similar.

I did yet another queen raising experiment this year. I took a frame of brood, killed some of the brood around several holes and laid the frame flat, parrellel to the ground in an empty medium with a slot in it to accommodate the width of the frame. I then stacked tow of these on top of each other with spacers holding the frame apart. They raised queens, I got somewhere from 15-20 cells. However they all seemed relatively small in comparison to other cells I've seen.

Sadly I miscalculated how old the larva was, well actually I think they raised queens off the older larva instead of the eggs, and they had all hatched :(

I'm just wondering if the way I did it caused smaller cells, which may have been less healthy or if the cell size matters. I was hesitant to try this again next year but if cell size doesn't matter and it works, it was easy enough and successful enough to try again next year.

I will definitely place empty frames into a hive I want genetics from so I know exactly how old all the eggs are next time.

~Matt
 

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As much as I dislike small cell size, I have actually come to like them. When I'm sure they have been well fed during development, the size of the cell makes NO difference in my experience. (Excluding obvious dinks) In fact slightly smaller cells are easier to candle before placing in nucs.
Check out the big black bootie sticking up in the JZBZ cup.



And the resulting queen:



Some of my worst queens have come out of big beautiful cells. The queen that came out of this big cell was pathetic.



My cell size this year has been smaller than average. But I've produced some of the nicest queens yet. I attribute the smaller cell size to the fact I am not feeding my cell builders syrup because of too much comb building all over the cells. But they get my special protein mix.





Overall queen size, big thorax and long abdomine are also genetic traits, not totally nutritional. You need both to get it though. (Good genetics & good nutrition)

The size of the cell is really a non issue. But it's hard to accept that fact until you experience it.

Early in the season I had some small cells that I just couldn't bring myself to place in the nucs. I hatched them out in the incubator..and then for 2 days was scrambling to make up nucs to accomodate them once they hatched. It was amazing somethign so big could come out of cells I thought about throwing away.
 

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I'll take a photo next time. Thumbnail size I would say. My thumbnail :) not a man's
 

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I'm used to seeing cells grown vertically on cups like the pictures you have and or hanging off the bottom, side of comb. In all of those orientations there is a large base the bees seem to build off of. The ones that they drew from the way I did it all seems very thing by comparison as they started from the one vertical cell coming off a flat surface. Most were very thin, but very obviously something came out of them :)

I will have to wait and see if any of them are successful queens as I simply left the queen cell hive alone since I was not about to try and find all the virgin queens running around the box assuming more then a couple are still alive anyway.

Thanks for the information.

~Matt
 
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