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I ran across the "Wire Excluder Frame" on Thorne's website and I was wondering if anyone has any experience with the technique.

I would attempt to make the trap frames with plastic excluders and using plastic frames that could simply scraped off or frozen...



The following is from the Dave Cushman site: http://website.lineone.net/~dave.cushman/varroatreatment.html

Queen/brood isolation
Various frame traps made of queen excluder material are produced by the appliance trade.
In a normal hive, Varroa infested brood is split between 60% drone and 40% worker brood.
By caging the queen on an empty drawn comb in a cage made of queen excluder material the mites can be 'drawn' to this frame as, after eight days, it will be the only one with open brood. After nine days this trapped brood is sealed and the frame is 'sacrificed' and another empty drawn comb placed with the queen in the trap. The second comb is sacrificed, again after 9*days, and a third frame is placed in the trap, if this is destroyed as well then we have no brood of any description left as after 24*days all other cells (worker or drone) will have emerged. The idea being that this isolated frame will have a disproportionate number of varroa infesting it and thus the destruction of it will harm the varroa more than the bees. It does disrupt brood development, but if it is timed for the back end of the main honey flow then will not reduce forager numbers and there is still time for a force of 'winter bees' to be raised. (There may even be a benefit in causing this to happen later than usual as the resulting winter bees will be slightly younger and thus have more life in spring.)

There are many variations to this method... one, two or three entrapments or one early in the season and one late. One, two or three combs per trap have been suggested and versions using drone comb or a mixture of drone/worker comb are also mentioned in literature.

This method is time consuming and messy, but it also provides a "brood break". One disadvantage of this technique is the cells vacated by the earliest emerging brood may be clogged with pollen and honey as they are out of reach of a laying queen.
 

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Can be much done faster with this same trap frame if you remove all of the young brood to another colony and place two frames a few days apart. Then all of the varroa will be attracted to the new brood brood frame by necessity. A couple of weeks later do that with the next colony that received the young brood, except steal young brood and eggs from that colony back into colony1 to balance population.

Or if you don't want to move the brood, follow Dave's plan starting a couple weeks before main flow, cause you kind of want to limit brood production at the time when they should be maturing for gathering nectar.

Even so, you won't get rid of all varroa. Look for a similar study in the new zealand publication called "control of varroa. a guide for new zealand beekeepers". Good comprehensive collection of various methods.

I will be doing the varro frame trap, but instead of sacrificing brood, I'll be heat treating it for 4 hours to bake the mites, but keep the bee lavae alive.
 

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I ran across the "Wire Excluder Frame" on Thorne's website and I was wondering if anyone has any experience with the technique.

I would attempt to make the trap frames with plastic excluders and using plastic frames that could simply scraped off or frozen...



The following is from the Dave Cushman site: http://website.lineone.net/~dave.cushman/varroatreatment.html
That seems like too long a brood break to me. Personally, I do find this product somewhat interesting, in that it does not damage the queen by allowing her to keep laying, but I'd just use it for one cycle and then use oxalic acid. Granted though, I'm lucky to be practicing beekeeping where oxalic acid is allowed. I'm not convinced, however, that it is worth the cost.
 

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@ArumF:

Could you elaborate of the "heat the frame for four hours" plan? How, how hot, evidence it doesn't hurt brood, etc. Thanks.

Enj.
 
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