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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

My name is Guillaume Gingras. I am studying computer science at the University of Rimouski in Quebec, Canada. This year, we have considered the issue of finding the queen bee in a hive and decided to make an image recognition algorithm to ease the job of finding the queen bee for everyone using some machine learning. In order to accomplish our mission, we need to gather thousands of images of queen bees. They can be surrounded by other bees also. Using these images will help us teach our computer which bee is the queen bee in the hope to make it easier for a beekeeper to pin point how your bees are doing. That is why I am coming here in the hope that somebody has images of their queen bees. Any contribution of images is helpful.

I would like to add that I am far from an expert in that field and if you think I should know something to better our study, feel free to let me know.

If you would like to contribute to the research, please contact me at:

[email protected]

Sincerely,

Guillaume Gingras
[email protected]
 

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to what purpose? to prove you can make an algorithm that can be used for recognition of something else? That i understand. But none of us are going to use a computer to find queens. It takes two hands to take a frame out and taking a picture of it which is then processed by a computer seems a pain. Also.......queens move. So unless its a real time process it won't be helpful.

Now.......if you want to make millions........use your idea to take a picture of a group of bees and count the mites on them. I'll pay you for that.
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>use your idea to take a picture of a group of bees and count the mites on them. I'll pay you for that.

Except most of the Varroa will be on the underside where you can't see them... or in the cells where you can't see them...

If you only need the pictures to train or test the program, I suggest there are thousands out there on the internet right now. Maybe even millions, but certainly thousands...

Often a queen is hiding under other bees, or has her back end in a cell...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the good replies! That's exactly why I came here. If I ultimately wanted to detect mites, I assume there is also a bunch of images online. Thanks for sharing your knowledge!
 

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A couple of thoughts for your project.

A typical hive has 10 frames, each frame has 2 sides, and she could be on either. You're not making one scan and done, you may be making up to 20.

Many people mark their queens with a paint marker. Just a dot on the back. I would think that rather than picking the shape of the queen out, the easier path would be to pick out the dot. Here is my million dollar idea for the rest of you, use florescent paint and a black light.

She may be under a clump of of other bees and you may miss her in your scan.

She may be crawling around on the lid or in the box. Those girls can hide.

Consider the practicality of your project. On the simplest end, a camera and laptop is necessary (unless we are talking about a cell phone app like mentioned above). And even when you see her on the monitor, your going to need to move back to the frame and then find her by eye to catch her.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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First off, I plan on giving the app a try this spring, just for giggles. Hate to state the obvious, but if you are having so much trouble spotting a queen that you think you need an app to help you, you need to spend more time practicing. When I first started, I could not find a queen to save my life. Now they are practically impossible to miss, if not hiding. You just need to train your eyes to "see" them.
 
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