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I just printed the New Zeeland varoa study/recommendations. The system they recommend involving joggling the drone frames between hives made me wander if this can be done if you’re using small cells. In that case, do you need to provide one large cell foundation for bees to raise drones? Wouldn’t that defeat the purpose of regressing? Maybe my understanding of the drone foundation is not correct. Could you clarify this for me, please? :(
Daniel
 

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>In that case, do you need to provide one large cell foundation for bees to raise drones?

Not a "large cell" as in 5.4mm cells, but drone cells as in 6.6mm cells.

>Wouldn’t that defeat the purpose of regressing?

Not at all.

>Maybe my understanding of the drone foundation is not correct.

Maybe. Foundation sizes: Small cell = 4.9mm. Large cell = 5.4mm. Drone cell = 6.6mm

>Could you clarify this for me, please?

I will not defeat the purpose of regressing, but once you get them regressed you probably won't need drone trapping. It might be useful while you are in the process. My only problem with the method is the amount of resources it costs the bees. Basically it takes a frame of honey and a frame of pollen to make a frame of brood. And you are just throwing that away with drone trapping.

One way to maximize the bees resources in drone trapping is to remove all the open brood first and then put in the drone comb. That way the varroa really have no where else to infest. About six or seven days later you can remove all the open worker brood again and then they will only have one place to go during the next few days (when the drones are getting capped), which will be the drone comb. But this is also a lot more work for the beekeeper.
 
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