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Hi
So it seems I lost two queens, yet the hive made it through the winter. On these two hives there were the signs of Nauseum, with runny looking feces on outside of hive, and on some frames inside. I did not get this on my two stong hives, which has a hard pollen flow going in. The week hives with the signs of Naseum have no pollen flow, nor any brood.
My question, as Nauseum is contagious, is does there exist a way to sterilze the pulled empty frames without destroying them, before I reuse the frames on new swarms traps/ caught swarms?
My thoughts were to create a small holding tank and buy a gallon of Hydrogen Peroxide, and mount the frame to the bottom (so as not to float) and allow the Peroxide to wash the frames? Has this been done, or would it kill the nauseum spores?
Or....should I simply not worry about it and simply treat in the fall with Fumigilon?
Thanks in Advance for Advice.
Regards,
Greathorned
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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Confinement causes dysentery. Nosema apis causes dysentery. Nosema ceranae has almost completely displaced Nosema apis and it does not cause dysentery.

"...and the rest of the Americas, where
the more virulent N. ceranae has possibly displaced N. apis..."

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022201107001735

Freezing will kill Nosema ceranae spores. Freezing will not kill Nosema apis spores.

http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/files/147621.pdf

Fumigillan contributes to Nosema cernanae infection:
http://www.plospathogens.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.ppat.1003185

And by killing the bacteria in their gut that protects them from Nosema, makes them more susceptible:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0033188

There is a good chance you just have simple dysentery. You can get a microscope and find out. There is much information on the internet on how to identify and count Nosema spores. Unfortunately it's not so simple to distinguish Nosema apis from Nosema Ceranae.
 
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