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I live in Phoenix, AZ, and it's definitely starting to warm up. Temps get up to 120 in the summer. I've been reading posts that say full sun to keep pests at bay. Is full sun really recommended in this extreme heat? If so, what steps would I need to take to aid ventilation. Any advice from locals would be appreciated, or anyone who lives in similar climates for that matter.

Thanks
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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I have never lived in AZ, but one summer in Western Nebraska it was up around 114 F. There was honey running out the entrance of the hive. It was very hard on the bees. I would go for afternoon shade if you can in a place that gets those kinds of temperatures. On the other hand I've seen Dee Lusby's hives out in the Sonora with no shade and thriving...
 

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I live in Phoenix, AZ, and it's definitely starting to warm up. Temps get up to 120 in the summer. I've been reading posts that say full sun to keep pests at bay. Is full sun really recommended in this extreme heat? If so, what steps would I need to take to aid ventilation. Any advice from locals would be appreciated, or anyone who lives in similar climates for that matter.

Thanks
I'm in phoenix and have been thinking about this. this will be my first summer with my bees.

Last year I did notice some hives that were shaded. It was very basic, some landscape fabric I think, with 2x2's for each corner.
 

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On the other hand I've seen Dee Lusby's hives out in the Sonora with no shade and thriving...
Michael,

Did Dee Lusby have any kind of special setup as far as covers or other ventilation additions to help keep her hives cool? I imagine this wouldn't be an issue with strong healthy colonies but mine are young and building up so I imagine it would be very stressful for them. Shade covers seem like a good idea. I've also seen some techniques where the hive cover consists of corrugated piece of material to allow air to circulate out the top. Is this a good idea? I've read that keeping the hive sealed is better because it allows the bees to control the hive temps more easily, particularly in really hot climates.
 

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We don't have your weather but I have always pushed back about an inch, each deep super and also push back on the honey supers in extreme heat. Push the inner cover back an inch and raise your top cover so that it is slanted on the lip of your inner cover. The more openings allow for a greater and more rapid evaporation of the nectar which in turn cools the hive and increases the honey yield. I only do this with strong hives. Open the screened bottom board as well. OMTCW
 

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>Did Dee Lusby have any kind of special setup as far as covers or other ventilation additions to help keep her hives cool?

She has a kind of bottom board/migratory cover that goes over an inner cover. That would make an airspace. All her hives are next to stock tanks that have board floating in them...
 

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A few old stories from my parents should apply. In Arizona you can produce cold water by hanging a canvas bag of it in a breeze. The air is so dry the evaporation can cool water to well below ambient. Old-timers there will probably report keeping a bag of water in front of the radiator grille on their cars, both to help engine cooling and to provide cool drinking water. This does not work so well in humid Virginia.

I think it is covered above. I'm sure the bees will want water and plenty of it, reasonably close at hand. That livestock watering tank mentioned above ought to do nicely. We're going to give ours a 7-gallon poultry waterer (the largest the ag supplier had) and put some rocks in the bottom tray so they don't drown.
 
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