Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have some questions on cleaning and drying pollen. I know that I have a few more months before I will have any pollen to collect in Alaska but I plan on harvesting a lot more pollen this year. I saw a pollen cleaning machine in one of the catalogs I received. It looked pretty simple but was wondering if anyone has built one and have any plans. The other question is how much drying do most people perform on their pollen and what is the best way? I have one of those Ronko dehydrators but I am not sure how dry the pollen should be at before I package it. I sold about 10 1 lb honey bottles at the State Fair last year and I received a call from one guy who wants as much pollen as he can get this year. I want to provide a good product so I want to ensure I process the pollen correctly.

Scott
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts
Basically you need a bit if wind, which you could provide with any fan. This is to remove any chaff. You can screen it through a fine screen to get the small stuff out and use that to feed back to the bees. Then you can screen it through #7 to get the large bee parts out and feed those to the chickens. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
i've gotten by with no mechanical cleaning, just visual and pick out the odd debris.
i've gotten by with no electrical dehydrater, just spread out a couple days then froze it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
I use a fan as well to blow out the debris. I don't dry it at all. It becomes like sawdust and doesn't stand apart from the commercially available stuff. I do tell customers that because my pollen is fresh and not dried, it should kept refrigerated or frozen.

The biggest issue I have is keeping the hive beetles out of the traps. I doubt that's an issue in Alaska.
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,120 Posts
IMO, if you have the Sundance II, it pretty much doesn't need cleaning. :) If you have the Sundance, you just need to spread it out and pick out a few things as it's pretty clean. If you have other bottom traps, you may need to clean it to get out the debris.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
My pollen is very close to debris free. I use the simple front door traps. I only trap after the colony begins to dwindle

I freeze mine right away. It gets harvested and into the freezer it goes. It stays there for a week and then is placed into the refrigerator where it thaws and the moisture wicks off.

The smaller containers are left to sit for three weeks then placed into a larger container that also sits in the refrigerator.

In the heat of summer I sometimes get carrion beetles in the pollen, especially when the humidity kicks up. I hand toss those after freezing but before mixing into the large container with the rest of the pollen to be packaged.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top