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Discussion Starter #1
I have been priming new cells with yogurt instead of royal jelly, it works good and was just wondering if anyone else is doing the same.
 

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Plain, I thought about trying LaYourt in Guava, but for now I am sticking to the plain. Actually it has about 13% protein, and the bees seem to prefer it over royal jelly.
 

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I've used plain yogurt in the past. My take is much higher with real royal jelly, although, in a pinch, I'd have no problem going back to yogurt.

In short: It works.
 

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So, my take with the priming of the cells is that the bees will get right to work replacing whatever was used to prime the cells with the royal jelly they deem appropriate. Are you suggesting that the yogurt is being used to feed the larva, or that it motivates the nurses to feed sooner, better, faster, etc....???
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good point, and to further explain why bees go for the yogurt is IMO, just as you suggested about the food supply and attraction to that supply.
I am trying something different over the next few weeks. My plan is to try different flavors of yogurt and see which flavor actually does the job best. LA YOGURT, makes very nice flavored yogurts in flavors such as mango, guave , papaya, and banana. I an going to try frame of each flavor and see what happens. I did try something last week that influenced this approach. I put palin yogurt on the top bar of one frame and guava on the next top bar. I came back two hours later and there were three times the number of bees on the guava as compared to the plain. Do you think that cells would get more attention and care being primed in guava as opposed to plain yogurt.
 

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I think the only good the yogurt, or even royal jelly, does is help to float the larva off the grafting tool. I've seen studies that show that the bees immediately remove and replace royal jelly used to prime cells. This is because over the feeding cycle for the larva they use different compositions at different levels of growth. Can't vouch for that info, but it sounds good! At any rate, if you do like to prime your cells it's pretty easy to get a supply of royal jelly by sacrificing a few cells.
 
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