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Any suggestions on pricing a 5-frame nuc with a newly hatched laying queen? I caught my own swarm a few weeks ago, put it in a 5-frame nuc and fed 1:1. I already have 5 hives and would rather sell it. I'd prefer to sell just the frames and not the box etc.
 

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if you caught your own swarm and put it in this nuc then isnt it the original queen? if so, you can market it as "proven overwintered". newbies eat that up! $180 w/o box, but there may not be a market for much longer being this late int he season...
 

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I had a double swarm that day. The larger group of bees stayed with the virgin queen (from an overwintered hive). I mark my queens so I know it wasn't the original. Our local club usually has members looking for nucs.
 

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My daughter and I are just starting our 4th year in beekeeping. We are up to 12 hives, and do not want to grow any larger. We have 4 over wintered nucs that we would like to sell. We are located in south carolina.
 

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Talk to your local beekeepers association or post an ad on Craigslist. You should be able to get anywhere from the $180 mentioned earlier to $225 for a proven overwintered nuc. Selling the bees and frames only, no box, is an option that I like. Or you can buy a few of the cardboard nuc boxes and sell them in those.
 

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Concerning the original post and Coal Reaper's comments: I am still somewhat a newbie (4 yrs) but I do think a colony that has overwintered with its queen (2nd year queen) is more valuable than a newly mated queen. She has proven herself and is going into her most productive year with her daughters. However, I would not represent a swarm as an overwintered colony because you really do not know that for a fact. J
 

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These are queens that we removed into nucs toward the end of our fliw last year. One came from our strongest hive. We never saw that queen all of last year. That hive produced 2 supers of honey in the fall, which is really rare where we are.
 
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