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Hey guys, I apologise if this has been discussed before, but I wanted to get opinions on the best way to prevent the original colony sending out a swarm with it's first virgin queen after the colony was split. I'm talking about hives that you wouldn't be able to get to very frequently so you could go back and reduce queen cells after splitting. Is there a way to set up the two halves in a way that minimizes the risk of swarming? I assume it has something to do with not leaving the original colony too strong and overpopulated by the time the first queen hatches, maybe shake out as much nurse bees as possible to the old queen hive? Leaving the queen cell hive with a lot of empty comb might be another idea, keeping the foragers busy thinking there's plenty of space to have fill up.
 

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Today my split hive swarmed with a virgin queen. I thought that after I removed the old queen, the bees will notice it and will wait for a virgin queen so she can start laying and yet that did not happen.
 

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Today my split hive swarmed with a virgin queen. I thought that after I removed the old queen, the bees will notice it and will wait for a virgin queen so she can start laying and yet that did not happen.
Yes, I'm in the same boat with one of my hives, - queen was removed, yet they made several new queens and launched several swarms without having a viable queen for the remaining hive.
One other hive swarmed way before queen cells were capped- pretty much as soon as the egg was laid there , they were gone. My guess is that once they made the swarming decision, there is almost nothing that will keep them back, they are not interested in the old colony any more which is contrary to some researchers claiming that colony survival is primary goal and expansion is secondary.
 
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