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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi and thanks for looking over my question. I am brand new and still learning before I actually get some bees, but I am moving forward. Lots to learn for sure.

I have been learning how to spot some of the different indications that your hive might be getting ready to swarm, and I understand that one of the major reasons is due to the lack of room. I've watched a handful of videos about various ways to intervene, etc.. however, most of it sounds way more advanced then were I'm at at this point.

My question is this: If you find indications that a hive might be preparing to swarm and it looks like it's due to lack of room, why couldn't you just replace some filled up frames with empty ones to make more room at that time? Or is that once the hive initiates their pre-swarming duties, then they'll swarm regardless? I'm talking about after you've actually seen the indications of bees preparing to swarm that is.


Thanks,
b1rd
 

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All want to reproduce every animal on the planet. once they decide they want to swarm the only thing i found effective was making a shook swarm. lack of room if they want to swarm that doesn't matter i've had many swarms that had plenty of room if it's a strong healthy colony that's what they do. if you can find a strain of bee that doesn't want to swarm as much.
 

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... Or is that once the hive initiates their pre-swarming duties, then they'll swarm regardless?...b1rd
You are generally correct, per the general knowledge.

Once the train has started, no graceful way to stop it quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies. I sort of suspected there was more to it then simply replacing a frame or two.
 
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