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This is from Michael Bush's website. "Powder sugar treatments are very temperature sensitive. Too cold and the mites don't fall. Too hot and the bees die." How hot is too hot and how cold is too cold?

[ September 29, 2006, 01:42 PM: Message edited by: betrbekepn ]
 

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I don't have the exact numbers in front of me. This is from memory, but according to Nick Aliano, who did the research at the University of Nebraska on it, the temperature of the bees (not the ambient air) needs to be up around 90 but less than about 100 F. If it's cooler not as many mite fall. If it's hotter the bees overheat, barf up their honey and die.

Nick was removing the bees from the hive, putting them in a cage and treating them with powdered sugar. According to his research, with cooler internal temps the mite fall was significantly less than with warmer temps.

The paper Nick wrote in 2004 was:
"Strategies for Using Powdered Sugar to Remove Varroa Mites from Adult Honey Bees"

I'm not sure where to find it, but that would be the accurate temperatures in that paper. I'm merely quoting what Nick said. I have done no experiments with it myself.
 
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