Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

21 - 35 of 35 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
5,793 Posts
Hmm, uh, parsnips? Whatever they are, they look skinny.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,273 Posts
I was going to say horse radish too. They look similar, but are mostly long, single strands. They are tough to clean (we usually peel the roots with a peeler) and a good blender is needed to chop them up. We usually can 8-10 pints a year. Good stuff to clear your sinus cavities too. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,044 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
OK, colleagues, one last hint - I dried them like so:
20201019_125604.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,044 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
Taraxacum officinale, aka Dandelion.
All it takes - NOT pulling the dandelions that settled in my veggie garden and letting them grow until fall.
Then pull.
They grow as big as parsnips in the garden soil.

I make dandelion "coffee", after roasting.
Liking it.
Also want to try adding it to my real coffee like decaff (to cut down the caffeine intake).
Good liver cleanser too, etc.

Some good reading:
 

·
Registered
Two 8-frame Langstroth hives
Joined
·
214 Posts
Great thread Greg. Thanks. Sounds like you do not crop rotate potatoes then? I have several small beds and try to rotate as much as I can, but thinking how I am going to crop rotate is the thing I hate most in veggie gardening.

BTW, growing potatoes is good if you want to break up clay soil without a sweat.
 

·
Super Moderator
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
5,793 Posts
Greg, I realize the cat is out of the bag now, but earlier today I was going to suggest either chicory or dandelion. Stupid changeover kept me from posting. The drying part lead me to those two possibilities, especially when coupled with your previous posts regarding natural diets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,044 Posts
Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
Greg, I realize the cat is out of the bag now, but earlier today I was going to suggest either chicory or dandelion. Stupid changeover kept me from posting. The drying part lead me to those two possibilities, especially when coupled with your previous posts regarding natural diets.
LOL, Yep!
The stupid change-over did mess up me too, some.
But yes, you dry up the cut dandelion root and store it as any old dry good.
When needed, I roast a batch on a skillet (cast iron works great) and use the roasted root simillarly to regular coffee beans (grind and brew). Good stuff. Good for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,044 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Great thread Greg. Thanks. Sounds like you do not crop rotate potatoes then? I have several small beds and try to rotate as much as I can, but thinking how I am going to crop rotate is the thing I hate most in veggie gardening.

BTW, growing potatoes is good if you want to break up clay soil without a sweat.
I don't do potatoes this year at all.
The last ~15 years I did on a rented lot in a local community garden, where I did the rotation and all that.
This year I dropped out of the community garden (maybe permanently due to few reasons).
The back yard garden does not allow much potato growing because it is a small patch (only 20'x40').

In my back yard patch, I rotate the crops annually.
Of course, the dandelions start in spring without asking me for approval and grow anywhere they choose to grow - and I let them.
Because I harvest them too, just as another crop (fully organic too!!!).
 

·
Super Moderator
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
5,793 Posts
Greg, Have you ever heard of trash can potatoes? They are supposed to take very little room and provide a large crop.

 

·
Registered
Two 8-frame Langstroth hives
Joined
·
214 Posts
trash can potatoes?
My very first potatoes were grown in a large bag. Extremely successful. I now also grow sweet potatoes in larger pots and always amaze myself when I harvest with how can all those potatoes fit in there.

Bury - Forget - Harvest.... can't get better than that.

This is the strange bit. I don't like sweet potatoes, but the ones I grow from store bought ones, in whatever soil, with no fertiliser apart some homemade compost, I like. I am not one that usually say everything home grown will taste better, but in this case I do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,044 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
Greg, Have you ever heard of trash can potatoes? They are supposed to take very little room and provide a large crop.

I, actually, knew this.
This season I tried growing the spuds in a spare compost bin I have (those black plastic ones).
Just a so-so outcome.
Too much nutrition was in there and produced great, huge vines but only average potato crop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,044 Posts
Discussion Starter #35
My very first potatoes were grown in a large bag. Extremely successful. I now also grow sweet potatoes in larger pots and always amaze myself when I harvest with how can all those potatoes fit in there.

Bury - Forget - Harvest.... can't get better than that.

This is the strange bit. I don't like sweet potatoes, but the ones I grow from store bought ones, in whatever soil, with no fertiliser apart some homemade compost, I like. I am not one that usually say everything home grown will taste better, but in this case I do.
Hmm.
I guess I could go for another try of the potatoes in the compost bin.
But I just converted the bin to be my horseradish spot - it will be horseradishes in that bin forward on.
 
21 - 35 of 35 Posts
Top