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We have concerns with possible queenless situation and health issues.

On Monday, it will be four weeks since the hive had its first swarm (taking the mature queen and large number of workers). There was an "afterswarm" with a virgin queen two weeks ago. Making 3 hives out of one (we recaptured both swarms).

In second swarm hive (which swarmed with a virgin queen two weeks ago), there are eggs, larvae, and collection of nectar and pollen. So all seems to be ok for now. We had fed them 2 times and now have taken the feeder out since we started to see capped honey. Was that right to do (we live in the central Midwest and the clover supply is now drying up).

However, in the original hive we discovered no eggs, larvae or brood. What we did find, shockingly, were 17 queen cell/cups near the bottom of a couple frames (empty, we think)! Do we need to find a mated queen quickly and get her introduced into this hive? What else can we do?

In the first swarm hive (the one with the mature queen), the bees had originally set about furiously collecting nectar and pollen but now it is entirely gone! They do not appear to be adding any back. The queen is laying as we saw larvae and capped brood (the cappings are slightly indented but not truly sunken). But there seems to be an unusually high number of what looks like to us - chalkbrood - the white deceased baby bees were found on several brood frames but what was surprising was the cluster of 17-20 in one group on one frame! We are raising the bees naturally and need suggestions accordingly.
 

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If you can give them a frame of open brood from another hive.

If they are queenless they will initiate making a queen - then you can decide to get a replacement or not - and you will prevent queenless issues like laying worker from cropping up.

If they have a queen they will just raise the brood normally, and it will strengthen the hive. Either way you will know in a few days what is going on just by looking at that one frame.
 

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Thanks for the reply. We gave this hive a frame of brood from my stronger hive yesterday. Yesterday, we did see some eggs in the hive although they were laid very sloppy with multiple eggs per cell and eggs on the sides (laying workers?). Anyway, time will tell the outcome whether these were laying workers or a new queen who just hasn't learned to lay neatly. Thanks again.
 

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Since the last swarm was two weeks ago, I would expect the new queen to start laying about now. She probably won't be laying perfectly at first. You may find double eggs, scattered laying, etc.
 
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