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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 6 poly nucs that I over wintered. They could use a push on feed. I've read how some beeks simply pour the syrup into the hive onto the bottom floor. How do they keep from drowning? How do they enter/exit the hive? What about moisture?
 

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The bees can use the bottoms of the frames like ladders to climb back out of the syrup. Drowning is not an issue.

How do they enter/exit the hive?

Through the entrance hole. If you fill the nuc with syrup higher than the entrance hole, the syrup will run out.
 

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I have poured syrup directly into my closed bottom nucs - but only when it is warm. If it is still cold, you are going to be adding a BIG moisture issue for your nucs to deal with.

I don't know what the best solution would be, but you might consider making thin pieces of candy, using fondant or pouring dry sugar onto the bottom.
 

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I have 6 poly nucs that I over wintered. They could use a push on feed. I've read how some beeks simply pour the syrup into the hive onto the bottom floor. How do they keep from drowning? How do they enter/exit the hive? What about moisture?
BeeTeach,

I had the same issue 2 years ago, so I pulled out my crappy tablesaw and made a handful of Imirie shim knockoffs ( about 2 inches high ) to fit the Nucs and their tops, I then used quart ziplock bags ( baggie technique ) filled with inverted syrup placed on top of the frames, the cluster will keep the syrup warm. This is essentially more work, but it works just fine for me and the bees are happy. :)

BB
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
BWB- I was thinking of that or making a cover with a hole in it for a feed jar. Temps are in the mid 50's the next week or so. Your idea may be better. Thanks.
 

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BWB- I was thinking of that or making a cover with a hole in it for a feed jar. Temps are in the mid 50's the next week or so. Your idea may be better. Thanks.
The feed jar top is great because you are not disturbing the girls, but the downside is that the temps will drop at night and unlike us humans, honeybees hate the cold stuff. I'm stuck on the baggie method. :)
 

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I use better bee top feeders and cut a shim to act as a box( as someone here mentioned) and put the cover on that , works just like a standard top feeder.
 

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At the Wooster show one of the speaker talk on this. He is drilling a 3/4 hole on a upper angle about a 1" up from the bottom and and one more at the other end at the top for ventilation. and had no problems. with drowning. He felt that he had more problem from straight in hole and snow and rain running into the boxes
 

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You are referring to Joe Latshaw's presentation.

Joe said he drilled a hole straight in an inch from the bottom for the entrance, and then on the back of the nuc he drilled a hole which angled upwards as a ventilation hole, which was positioned an inch from the top of the nuc.

He has found that on the upper ventilation hole, if he drills it straight in, rainwater can get inside. Drilling the hole on an upwards angle prevents the rainwater from entering the nuc throught he ventilation hole.
 

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Yes he did. I don't remember the % but it was high And I thought I remember that he did both on a upper angle. So that water could'nt run into the hive.
 

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IIRC, Joe said 37 of the 40 polystyrene nucs survived. The 3 that died had queen problems. The cells didn't take.

I believe all 20 some wooden nucs were alive when he checked them the end of January.
 
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